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Discussion Starter #1
Its been almost a month now that I am going crazy about upcoming Honda HR-V. Here's the latest news on Honda HR-V for HR-V enthusiasts.

The EPA has published fuel economy numbers for Honda's new subcompact crossover, which debuted a few months ago at the Los Angeles auto show. The 2016 Honda HR-V tops out at 28/35 mpg city/highway when paired with two-wheel drive and a CVT transmission.
You can get more details from the links below.

Source:
http://wot.motortrend.com/1501_2016_honda_hr_v_rated_2835_mpg_with_cvt_fwd.html

Tips:
For people like me who wants to buy Honda HR-V, always ask for Out of the Door price from the dealers. If they say they can't provide or make excuses, RUN as fast as you can. Out of the door price is what's most important, not a selling price because all dealers have different prices.
 

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So are they trying to say that dealers are going to add a bunch of bull **** fees over the selling price?

The mpg sounds pretty good though. Not stellar, but very good.
 

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They will 200 percent charge that amount

oh ya..they will add 3000 plus after you fix the deal. I have done tons of research on it, that's why thought of giving you guys a heads up before buying a car.
 

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oh ya..they will add 3000 plus after you fix the deal. I have done tons of research on it, that's why thought of giving you guys a heads up before buying a car.
Ben,
I don't understand a word you have said. It sounds like you are saying you can tell the dealer what you want to pay merely by saying "I want the "out the door price". What does that even mean? Why should he listen? How can he add 3000 plus after you have closed a deal?


Are you by any chance talking about sales tax AFTER you close the deal?


Please explain.
 

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I am not sure exactly re that term, but I DO think and hope that just us wanting the car pretty quickly does not mean we pay MSRP price for it. there have been cars in high demand that have sold for higher than MSRP because the dealers could get it. I won't be doing that - however I really am interested in getting this car.
 

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I am not sure exactly re that term, but I DO think and hope that just us wanting the car pretty quickly does not mean we pay MSRP price for it. there have been cars in high demand that have sold for higher than MSRP because the dealers could get it. I won't be doing that - however I really am interested in getting this car.
I am really spoiled I guess, when I got my Scion there was set pricing. No dealer could charge more. And that price was really good for all the standard things we got. So it was just about picking a dealer you wanted to use. There was a little pressure to add dealer stuff, but a simple "No" took care of it.

If I buy an HR-V, I will be using online resources to find the best price.

The other consideration is, if every dealer in the state offers the same price for a high demand car, what are you going to do?
 

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oh ya..they will add 3000 plus after you fix the deal. I have done tons of research on it, that's why thought of giving you guys a heads up before buying a car.
Is this your first time ever purchasing a vehicle?

Here are some real tips:

1. Be willing to walk away at any time. The HR-V is not a special vehicle, there will be THOUSANDS of them available all across the US - you will be able to find another dealer who wants your business.

2. NEVER....EVER...negotiate figures based on a monthly payment. The amount you pay per month is determined by many factors and can be easily skewed to make it seem like you are getting a good deal. Find a basic car loan calculator online and familiarize yourself with how much you can afford (cars.com has a good one). Which leads me to my next point:

3. ALWAYS arrange for financing through financial institutions like your local bank or credit union before going to the dealership. Many dealers pad the interest rates on loans, which puts more money into their pockets. Getting approved at another institution will set a baseline that you should ask them to beat.

4. Never say "What's the best price you can give me?" - do you really think they're ever going to do that without giving higher priority to their financial interests? Offer a specific price and don't be afraid to go back and forth. Note: Cars like the HR-V are going to be difficult to negotiate on, simply because there is so little margin built into the MSRP for the dealer to make money on.

I highly recommend listening to This American Life: On the Car Lot - it provides a lot of insight into the car buying process: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/513/129-cars
 

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I am really spoiled I guess, when I got my Scion there was set pricing. No dealer could charge more. And that price was really good for all the standard things we got. So it was just about picking a dealer you wanted to use. There was a little pressure to add dealer stuff, but a simple "No" took care of it.

If I buy an HR-V, I will be using online resources to find the best price.

The other consideration is, if every dealer in the state offers the same price for a high demand car, what are you going to do?
Buy the car out of state? Another mistake people make is setting limits on how far they are willing to travel for the right car.

Take for instance the new 2015 WRX: when it came out, many dealers were tacking on "market adjustments" of $2k+. But if you were willing to travel to Colorado Springs, Heuberger Motors (the largest Subaru dealer in the US) sells them for more than $2k off of MSRP if you contact one of their online sales representatives.

Living in Florida, it would be cheaper for me to take a one way flight there AND drive back than to purchase locally.

With that said, anyone paying MORE than MSRP on the HR-V is a fool.
 

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Buy the car out of state? The biggest mistake people make is setting limits on how far they are willing to travel for the right car.

Take for instance the new 2015 WRX: when it came out, many dealers were tacking on "market adjustments" of $2k+. But if you were willing to travel to Colorado Springs, Heuberger Motors (the largest Subaru dealer in the US) sells them for more than $2k off of MSRP if you contact one of their online sales representatives.

Living in Florida, it would be cheaper for me to take a one way flight there AND drive back than to purchase locally.

With that said, anyone paying MORE than MSRP on the HR-V is a fool.
I agree. My biggest fear last time I bought a car is that the dealers would slap a lot of extras on the car it making it hard to find a clean one. That time, it wasn't a problem in the end. I just waited for one to come off the line with what I wanted and ordered.

It is almost a given when this car comes out that they will tack on goodies and hide their extra profits in the cost of options or accessories. They will try to use the excitement and the high interest in this car to get away with soaking you. Be patient and wait for things to die down. When inventories build, the dealers will ease up on padding the sticker with "goodies" like upgraded wheels and door edge guards. That is, if you let them know that is what you demand.

The question is.....will a lot of anxious buyers here fall sway to being the first on the block to have one and overpay for it? ( I admit being first is a temptation....patience is better).
 

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Is this your first time ever purchasing a vehicle?

Here are some real tips:

1. Be willing to walk away at any time. The HR-V is not a special vehicle, there will be THOUSANDS of them available all across the US - you will be able to find another dealer who wants your business.

2. NEVER....EVER...negotiate figures based on a monthly payment. The amount you pay per month is determined by many factors and can be easily skewed to make it seem like you are getting a good deal. Find a basic car loan calculator online and familiarize yourself with how much you can afford (cars.com has a good one). Which leads me to my next point:

3. ALWAYS arrange for financing through financial institutions like your local bank or credit union before going to the dealership. Many dealers pad the interest rates on loans, which puts more money into their pockets. Getting approved at another institution will set a baseline that you should ask them to beat.

4. Never say "What's the best price you can give me?" - do you really think they're ever going to do that without giving higher priority to their financial interests? Offer a specific price and don't be afraid to go back and forth. Note: Cars like the HR-V are going to be difficult to negotiate on, simply because there is so little margin built into the MSRP for the dealer to make money on.

I highly recommend listening to This American Life: On the Car Lot - it provides a lot of insight into the car buying process: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/513/129-cars
Excellent advice. I know you have bought a lot of cars over the last 10 years, so we can benefit from your experience.
 

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I agree. My biggest fear last time I bought a car is that the dealers would slap a lot of extras on the car it making it hard to find a clean one. That time, it wasn't a problem in the end. I just waited for one to come off the line with what I wanted and ordered.

It is almost a given when this car comes out that they will tack on goodies and hide their extra profits in the cost of options or accessories. They will try to use the excitement and the high interest in this car to get away with soaking you. Be patient and wait for things to die down. When inventories build, the dealers will ease up on padding the sticker with "goodies" like upgraded wheels and door edge guards. That is, if you let them know that is what you demand.

The question is.....will a lot of anxious buyers here fall sway to being the first on the block to have one and overpay for it? ( I admit being first is a temptation....patience is better).
I'm just glad I'm not on the market for a vehicle today. I won't need to look at buying until December at the earliest. By then, the excitement will have died down and I should be able to get exactly what I want at the price I want.
 

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I paid sticker price for mine. first one the dealer sold. They wouldn't budge. 2nd day they had them..2 months ago. They did give me free car washes and free oil changes for as long as I own it! I told them they had to give me something I can pay sticker price anywhere!
 
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