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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just put 1000 miles on my AWD HR-V Sport that I got in November 2020 and the gas mileage computer tells me that I'm getting 16.9 mpg.

That's 100% unacceptable. Anyone know why it's so low? My commute to work is approx a third of a mile (.33 yes I live THAT close to my job).
 

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Not sure where you live but cold weather will definitely hurt your MPG. Do you store a ton of items in your HRV? If all your miles are just very short trips, your MPG will also be reduced.

You can search the threads as there have been similar ones about reduced MPG.
 

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Short trips are not good for mileage- i have about 6 mile commute each way - and i avg about 19.2 for the last 4 years ( on longer highway trips i can get about 34 easily, as per the trip monitor)
the tiny engine has a small amount of torque - needs to be rev'd up to run around town.
 

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Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
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I would be more concerned these short journeys may cause condensation build up in the oil filler cap.

Over December, I had to do several short journeys of 1/2 mile or so per day covering for colleagues, Whilst carrying out weekly checks on the car; tyre pressures and fluid levels, I noticed a white froth beginning to form in underside of the oil filler cap, which I had not seen before in the 9 months since I purchased the vehicle.

31261


A quick search revealed one possible cause was due to ME not giving the engine enough time to warm up, compounded by the sharp drops in temperatures - some nights it would drop to -10C.

Since adding a regular 10 mile motorway blast every now and then, the froth has disappeared. These motorway journeys have also had a positive impact on my average mpg.
 

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I would be more concerned these short journeys may cause condensation build up in the oil filler cap.

Over December, I had to do several short journeys of 1/2 mile or so per day covering for colleagues, Whilst carrying out weekly checks on the car; tyre pressures and fluid levels, I noticed a white froth beginning to form in underside of the oil filler cap, which I had not seen before in the 9 months since I purchased the vehicle.

View attachment 31261

A quick search revealed one possible cause was due to ME not giving the engine enough time to warm up, compounded by the sharp drops in temperatures - some nights it would drop to -10C.

Since adding a regular 10 mile motorway blast every now and then, the froth has disappeared. These motorway journeys have also had a positive impact on my average mpg.
yep- A full heated engine will boil the moisture out.
- and an engine not up to temp is in open loop conditions where there maybe excess fuel sprayed in into the cylinder to maintain idle. A warmed up engine goes into closed loop conditons with the ECU adjusting fuel accordingly.
 

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Your commute is only 1/3 mile? I suggest walking. (Only half kidding.) :oops:

++++++++++++

When these types of complaints come up, I always suggest the following:

1. Drive to your favorite gas station, far enough to warm up the engine.
2. Fill up your HR-V to the pump's automatic cutoff. Record mileage.
2. Drive 100 miles, all at once. Might take 2 hours. Hopefully your route is scenic!
3. Before returning home, fill up at the SAME gas pump. Record mileage again, and gallons used.
4. Calculate your actual MPG (do not rely on the car's dash display). Miles driven, divided by gallons used. (OMG, there is MATH involved, LOL)

PLEASE post back with the results, perhaps with a note about driving conditions (ambient temp, highway VS suburban driving etc)
 

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That is unacceptable. But you have 2 issues at play here. The car is barely broken in. And winter is not good for mpg. My 2 civics with around 25k miles each, they both have seen at least 2-4mpg drop because of winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Living in northwest NJ, it's definitely been cold and the low miles driven each day both contribute to lower miles.
I hope to make a road trip soon and I'll give your advice a shot.

Your commute is only 1/3 mile? I suggest walking. (Only half kidding.) :oops:

++++++++++++

When these types of complaints come up, I always suggest the following:

1. Drive to your favorite gas station, far enough to warm up the engine.
2. Fill up your HR-V to the pump's automatic cutoff. Record mileage.
2. Drive 100 miles, all at once. Might take 2 hours. Hopefully your route is scenic!
3. Before returning home, fill up at the SAME gas pump. Record mileage again, and gallons used.
4. Calculate your actual MPG (do not rely on the car's dash display). Miles driven, divided by gallons used. (OMG, there is MATH involved, LOL)

PLEASE post back with the results, perhaps with a note about driving conditions (ambient temp, highway VS suburban driving etc)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't store anything in the car. I'm in northeast NJ and it's been a cold winter.
I warm the car up every day before I drive it.

Not sure where you live but cold weather will definitely hurt your MPG. Do you store a ton of items in your HRV? If all your miles are just very short trips, your MPG will also be reduced.

You can search the threads as there have been similar ones about reduced MPG.
 

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I warm the car up every day before I drive it.
That will KILL MPG, you know....especially if you idle the car for 10 minutes for a one-minute commute.

Most common guidance is to warm the car for 30 - 60 seconds, then drive away (slowly, because an idling engine does NOT warm up transmissions, wheel bearings, or suspension bushings etc) o_O
Clearing frost/snow from a windshield is another matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I warmed up and drove my 2017 Civic EX-T the SAME amount and I drove it harder than this current HR-V and it averaged a little over 27 mpg. I know the Civic gets better mpg overall, but the percents don't match up.

Using the Civic's actual mpg / mfg mpg = 27/32 = 84%
HR-V actual mpg / mfg mpg = 17/28 = 61% ..... If the Civic % was what I got with the HR-V, I'd be getting 23.5 mpg, not 16.9. I was expecting to see the HR-V at slightly over 20-21 mpg when I was thinking about what the trip computer was going to tell me.

Anyway.....I've only had the HR-V for a short while. I still have 2 yrs and 8 months left on my lease. In the long run I'll never be filling it up with gas much anyway. Hopefully as it breaks in, it'll get better and when the warm weather comes, that seems like it should help as well.

In retrospect, I should have bought the Civic EX-T instead of turning it in for the HR-V, although the snow this winter would have been difficult to navigate with the 2wd turbo Civic.
 

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I live in North Eastern Pennsylvania, so I'm very aware of your locale and weather and exposed to the same conditions as you. However, my 2018 HR-V EX averages around 30.5 MPG in these winter months, and I average 36-37 MPG in the summer. If you're only getting 16 MPG, I would be very concerned there's a serious issue. Of course, short trips like yours are not a good idea as well, but it shouldn't reduce mileage so severely.

Having said that, for a more accurate variable I would recommend you do the math with the mileage between filling the tank up with gas. Fill the tank and when you get to about a quarter of a tank fill it up again and divide the miles by the gallons it took to refill the tank. All of the short trips you take could be affecting the computers ability to accurately calculate your MPG.

I wish I lived as close to my job as you do, because I would absolutely do what pearlwhite01 suggested and walk or mountain bike to work for exercise. Might even be faster, lol.
 

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P.S. Another possibility could be bad gas or old gas. Given the low mileage you drive between filling the tank up, it's comparable to putting the vehicle into storage.
You may need to add fuel stabilizer to your tank every time you fill it up in order to prevent the gas from going bad. It only takes a couple weeks for gasoline to begin to degrade, and only a couple of months for the gasoline in a tank to go bad, unless you add fuel stabilizer to the tank which would significantly extend the life of the fuel. If you don't add stabilizer, some of the volatile compounds evaporate over time and the gasoline degrades and looses its combustibility.
I don't know how long it takes you before you have to refill your tank, but if it's a couple months I would recommend you try some fuel stabilizer in your tank the next couple times you fill up in order to see if it makes any impact. Fuel stabilizer is not expensive at all, especially if it fixes your dilemma.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
For those of you suggesting that I walk or bike to work, I'm a school teacher and I'm not going to bike or walk in my dress shoes and tie. Plus on hot days with the 1 larger hill I'd have to climb would equal sweating and that's not happening right after I JUST showered in the morning.
 

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I think you need to read a little sarcasm in there. You are pretty much worse case scenario for mpg.
Short trips, in town driving is never consistent between cities/commutes
Take it on a 30 min highway trip, once you get up to speed reset the trip odometer.
If you can’t hit stated mpg bring it to the dealer
Don’t warm up more than 30 seconds as recommended.
 
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