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Thanks for the tips, just popped mine out to check it (not sure if it’s come up on my minder yet I’ve only. Had 2 in 2.5 years thanks to my short commute). We’ve had a lot of wildfire smoke here, and one day of actual ash fall like the Mt St Helens eruption. I presume from all the pictures I’ve seen the Honda OEM filter should be white, not stark gray as if it were charcoal infused? Hoping that a new filter for $20 will alleviate the gross dirty gym sock smell that comes out any time the AC turns on/off. So gross and so embarassing when someone is with me.
 

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If your have a musty smell or gym smell your filter has mildew. You should replace it. Until you replace it, vacuum it and spray it with a disinfectant air spray. Lysol makes one they say will kill 99.9% of viruses and bacteria. You car will smell great for the next few times you start up the a/c. Great way to make your car to blow good smelling air.

Alternately you can run the a/c and spray the intake vents under the hood.

I have a Odyssey with the same problem but the filter is much more difficult to replace. A mechanic told me to turn the heater full blast for a few miles will kill the odor. Could only do this early in the morning with all the window rolled down and the heater on defrost.
 

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Woah, I've never had mine out to look at and I have 42k miles haha
 

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The1999 - 2004 Odyssey required the removal of the glove box, some side trim, a retention bar just to get to the filter. About 8 screws plus some plastic holders. Honda charged over two hundred dollars to replace this filter. It is supposed to be changed once a year. If you don't change. it can develop a musty smell when the a/c is blowing.

Glad to see Honda have made it easy on the HRV.
My repair shop specializes in Japanese makes and we see a LOT of Hondas. I can't recall my guys ever saying there was anything very difficult about an Odyssey cabin filter,

Don in Austin
 

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At 37K the air in the HRV was getting stale and the AC was not really happy so I searched for a new cabin filter replacment and found the Fram Fresh Breeze - since it has 600 positive reviews and was fairly cheap I decided to give it a shot.


Install is easy you open the glove box, pop off the the strut claw and pinch the sides until the stop is free.

Then you squeeze both sides of the cover and pull the filter out, when you do notice the design - the fram has writing on the sides indicating which end up - the honda filter has it on the front. It is a tighter fit for the cover to go back on but its not hard.

My filter was pretty dirty and a ton of bugs so I wasn't surprised when I turned the car on and the AC was back to like new, actually it seems more powerful now. It's possible this filter is less restrictive, high quality than OEM - the air seems fresh and I have noticed less humidity down at the beach, fogging up the windows etc.

Also I noticed now that suddenly my head also feels alot cooler without any other changes. I still may need to ac some refrigerant to get it maxed out but its been super nice with it 100+ here to have a solid AC going again.

It would be hard to say if the charcoal and baking soda are making a real difference compared to a new OEM filter but it certainly feels like it does when I sat in a brand new on the other day and alot of reviewers felt it does too, alot cheaper than a dealer instal anyway.

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I change mine 2x a year. Right before summer (tail end of spring)- and right after all the trees start losing leaves in end of fall.Yep- use the cheapo ones too. Always lots of leaves, seed, dead bugs.
 

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From the research I've done, charcoal is a gimmick because it doesn't usually last for longer than a month.

Most people change their filter once to twice a year so in my opinion, there's no point in buying one that has it. Cheap electrostatic might be better in the long run.

If you're looking for something effective for the full duration, a PM2.5 filter would be required. HEPA is a joke because it'll restrict the air flow. I bought the Bosch HEPA and my windows couldn't defrost in the winter so it became a safety issue. The Fram Fresh Breeze OP posted has fantastic air flow.

Lots of manufacturers make PM2.5 filters for our HRV but only for the Asian and European markets.

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Asian market (ships to the rest of the world) -

This is the one I use ($16USD for the filter and $15USD for shipping):
Amazon | ホンダ ヴェゼル(VEZEL)用 エムリット フィルター (MLITFILTER) 日本製 D-050_VEZEL | エアコンフィルター | 車&バイク


I love it because the air isn't restricted at all.

Bosch makes one called the AP-H09

Denso makes one called the DCC3008

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European market (ships to the rest of the world) -

Mann FP21003
18USD + $20USD for shipping from Germany to North America

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Here's a video of my filter being tested with PM2.5 sensors:
 

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I went with the new K&N washable/reusable cabin air filter last fall in our HRV and TSX.
It was about CDN$50 on Amazon and hopefully will last for many years.
I have been using K&N engine air filters for over 30 years.

Our HRV is parked for the summer while my wife drives our TSX. No issues with the K&N cabin filter.

No idea on what the K&N cabin air filter rating is.

Edit: Reading the details, the K&N cabin filter is synthetic and electrostatic.
More info on cabin air filters than I have ever thought about!

 
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At 37K the air in the HRV was getting stale and the AC was not really happy so I searched for a new cabin filter replacment and found the Fram Fresh Breeze - since it has 600 positive reviews and was fairly cheap I decided to give it a shot.


Install is easy you open the glove box, pop off the the strut claw and pinch the sides until the stop is free.

Then you squeeze both sides of the cover and pull the filter out, when you do notice the design - the fram has writing on the sides indicating which end up - the honda filter has it on the front. It is a tighter fit for the cover to go back on but its not hard.

My filter was pretty dirty and a ton of bugs so I wasn't surprised when I turned the car on and the AC was back to like new, actually it seems more powerful now. It's possible this filter is less restrictive, high quality than OEM - the air seems fresh and I have noticed less humidity down at the beach, fogging up the windows etc.

Also I noticed now that suddenly my head also feels alot cooler without any other changes. I still may need to ac some refrigerant to get it maxed out but its been super nice with it 100+ here to have a solid AC going again.

It would be hard to say if the charcoal and baking soda are making a real difference compared to a new OEM filter but it certainly feels like it does when I sat in a brand new on the other day and alot of reviewers felt it does too, alot cheaper than a dealer instal anyway.

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I changed my 2016 HR-V cabin air filter today with the Fram CF11182 that you suggested. Much easier to do than on my 2005 pilot which took 45 minutes and involved several tools including a saw! First thing I noticed that was that Fram is noticeably heavier than the original filter. So I weighed it with my postage scale and the Fram was 5.5 oz compared to 2.2 oz for the original filter, quite a big difference. The new filter also feels much more substantial; hopefully it does not have excessive air resistance. As you noted, the Fram gets installed with the writing facing the side of the car unlike the original which has the writing facing out. The filter pleats need to be compressed somewhat to get the cover back on. Overall, a 5 minute job with no tools required.
 

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I use the EcoGard XC36080. Never been a fan of washable/reusable filters. Partially due to laziness (2 minute parking lot swap vs. however long to wash, rinse, and dry filter), partially because K&Ns flow better because they don't filter as well, partially because I'd need 4 cabin filter changes before I break even.

 

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I went with the new K&N washable/reusable cabin air filter last fall in our HRV and TSX.
It was about CDN$50 on Amazon and hopefully will last for many years.
I have been using K&N engine air filters for over 30 years.

Our HRV is parked for the summer while my wife drives our TSX. No issues with the K&N cabin filter.

No idea on what the K&N cabin air filter rating is.

Edit: Reading the details, the K&N cabin filter is synthetic and electrostatic.
More info on cabin air filters than I have ever thought about!

As long as someone isn't lazy, the K&N options are pretty cool.

I used to think it's all marketing but testing by project farm on youtube showed them to be effective.

Good option for those who care about saving money in the long run or the environment.
 

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As long as someone isn't lazy, the K&N options are pretty cool.

I used to think it's all marketing but testing by project farm on youtube showed them to be effective.

Good option for those who care about saving money in the long run or the environment.
Project Farm's testing is pretty thorough, even if it's not in a completely-controlled lab environment. But for me, I can find other ways to save money than the ~$2 per month it costs to install a brand new filter twice a year.

This is anecdotal, but I think riding a bicycle to work and not driving 3 miles like some of my coworkers helps the environment more than having a reusable filter. Especially since cars are most polluting until the cats are fully warmed-up and the car goes into closed-loop.
 

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The last time I replaced my cabin filter, I used the Fram. I was disappointed by how many fewer "pleats" it has vs. the OEM, much less filter material. The next time I plan to use the Ecogard.
 

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I vacuum cleaner both the cabin air filter and engine air filter every spring. The dealer does my maintenance and neither filters have been replaced in 4.5 yrs (since new). Works for me!
 

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As long as someone isn't lazy, the K&N options are pretty cool.

I used to think it's all marketing but testing by project farm on youtube showed them to be effective.

Good option for those who care about saving money in the long run or the environment.
I had that K&N cabin filter for over a year- cleaning was a bit of a PITA, and of course you had to let it dry- so for me I had to plan not to use my HRV while i cleaned/dried it, so it was an end of day thing and dry overnight.
I did notice a slight whistle when I had 4 or more BARS on the fan speed- and had the freshair open and air througth the front vents (heat and defrost it was not there, or when on RECIRC, the whistle was gone)- it went away with the paper filters and the came back when i swapped back in. It was def the filter- and it was annoying as hell.
 
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