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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been hit with some nasty sprinklers on my hood about 4 times now in the 5 months of ownership. Each time they sat for no more than 12 hours (overnight and into the day) before I washed the spots off. My area has some super hard and mineral rich sprinkler water so each time I would have instant water spots still left after washing. I would use meguires 3 in 1 wax (cleaner, polish, and wax) to buff them out. The spots seem like they were gone, but then I go to a Chevron gas station at night that has great and super bright white flourecesnt lights and I can see the spots are still there even though the surface feels smooth to the touch meaning those spots etched super deep into the clear coat. This has happened all 4 times as I now do a final inspection under the Chevron lights. lol.

The second time I got hit I ended up using Meguires Ultimate Compound and a clay bar to fully rid myself of the water spots. I then finished it off with Turtle Wax Ceramic Spray Wax. But when I got hit by sprinklers the 3rd time which was about 4 weeks later, and the spots are deeply imbedded in the clear coat again just like before! It's like the Ceramic wax didn't even do anything, not even minimized it. It's almost like I have a naked and unprotected clear coat.

From day one I have applied Meguires Hybrid Ceramic Spray, then Turtle Wax Ceramic Spray, then Turtle Wax Graphene Flex Wax. (I've been trying to find the best protection) and each one of those "ceramic/graphene" spray waxes have failed miserably at even trying to reduce the water spots. I even watch the manufactures youtube videos on how to properly apply them.

I'm wondering if anyone else has noticed this? I'm beginning to wonder if these spray ceramic/graphene waxes either enhance the effects of water spots, or just completely fail against them. I'm starting to feel like these new waxes are just marketing hype. I switched back to my tried and true Meguires Gold Class Carnuba wax which I used for my old car which never had as bad water spotting issues as this new car.

Also wondering if it's just the quality of the clear coat on this Honda as my previous car was a 20 year old Toyota Camry.

I want to Use the Ultimate Compound again to fully erase the spots, but I don't want to be shaving off another layer of clear coat this early in my ownership. Was hoping to keep the car at least 10 years. So I'm thinking of just leaving it since all it takes is a windy night and I'll probably get the water spots from hell all over again.

Any thoughts?

(Note: Haven't been hit by sprinklers since applying the Carnuba wax, so no idea on its effectiveness.)

My Car:
2021 HRV EX (Agean Blue)
 

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Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
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If the wax/polish and so on are doing their job, you should be able to remove the water spots with a Quick Detailer.

If that is failing to remove them I would look at using a different product, possibly one that is carnuba wax enriched. I do not have any experience of using these graphene or ceramic waxes, so I am not in a position to comment on them, but I prefer to use a more 'traditional' wax on my vehicle; Double Speed-Wax | T1 Carnauba Wax - Bilt Hamber
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If the wax/polish and so on are doing their job, you should be able to remove the water spots with a Quick Detailer.

If that is failing to remove them I would look at using a different product, possibly one that is carnuba wax enriched. I do not have any experience of using these graphene or ceramic waxes, so I am not in a position to comment on them, but I prefer to use a more 'traditional' wax on my vehicle; Double Speed-Wax | T1 Carnauba Wax - Bilt Hamber
Yah, I def do not recommend bothering with those new ceramic/graphene waxes. I think the coating they provide is just so thin that it can't defend against sprinkler water. They do make your car very shiny and slick, but don't seem to fair to well in the real world. Seems like they are best for show cars or weekend drivers.

I slapped on 2 coats of Meguires Carnuba wax. Nice and thick. It even fills in minor swirl marks too which means it has to be a thicker layer since ceramic/graphene cannot fill in swirls.

Really wish I never bought into the marketing hype for those products. I now have a thinner clear coat on the hood because of the first compounding, and I still have water spots.....😔. Maybe I'll just wrap it in the future if it gets worse. 🤷‍♂️
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Once mixed. Spray on a soft cloth, wipe in and then wipe off with soft dry cloth. Done!
Thanks for the recommendation. But for now I want to stay away from all spray type waxes. I put so much effort polishing out those water spots and then those spray waxes just failed completely at protecting against the new water spots. Not gonna take anymore chances. lol. I'm just gonna stick with my tired and true carnuba, 2 coats.....maybe I'll add a 3rd coat just for good measure. 😂
 

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Sounds like you're in need of some paint correction (DA polisher with polishing compound) and then forget all of that useless spray on crap. Then follow up with a ceramic coating. Just purchased a new HR-V EX last month and plan on putting on some Armor Shield IX ceramic coating as I'll never again use any type of wax, much less any of those gimmicky "easy to use" spray on products. But, that's just my opinion and the best of luck! ;)
 

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I would be very cautious using a polisher, as the HR-V's paint is so thin as to be practically non existent.

Had a paint shop burn through the paint on my bonnet when they were repairing some chips. They said they had never seen paint so thin. I ended up getting the entire bonnet resprayed.

I only used them as other bodyshops would only quote for a full respray due to previous issues with Honda paintwhen trying to blend the repair in.

@Han Seoul-Oh

I do the following twice a year;


I don't use Tar Remover, and I apply my Iron (Fallout) Remover via a pump spray rather than a trigger spray.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sounds like you're in need of some paint correction (DA polisher with polishing compound) and then forget all of that useless spray on crap. Then follow up with a ceramic coating. Just purchased a new HR-V EX last month and plan on putting on some Armor Shield IX ceramic coating as I'll never again use any type of wax, much less any of those gimmicky "easy to use" spray on products. But, that's just my opinion and the best of luck! ;)
Ceramic does sound like a nice option now. Wish I did that before getting the spots. But at this point, I don't want to risk thinning my clear coat anymore than I have already. Live and learn I guess. And congrats on the new HRV!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would be very cautious using a polisher, as the HR-V's paint is so thin as to be practically non existent.

Had a paint shop burn through the paint on my bonnet when they were repairing some chips. They said they had never seen paint so thin. I ended up getting the entire bonnet resprayed.

I only used them as other bodyshops would only quote for a full respray due to previous issues with Honda paintwhen trying to blend the repair in.

@Han Seoul-Oh

I do the following twice a year;


I don't use Tar Remover, and I apply my Iron (Fallout) Remover via a pump spray rather than a trigger spray.
Thats sad to hear about the paint chip repair. I plan to just leave the hood alone now after that first hand compounding, don't wanna take any chances burning through the clear.

Did they do a good job color matching the hood to the rest of the car? I heard the pearl white is very difficult to color match and was wondering if our Agean Blue is the same. I figure I might need to respray my hood in a few years if I thinned out my clear more than I thought. Hope not though...
 

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I've no complaints about the colour matching or blending;

32276


After the dealership refused to deal with it I was all set to have it resprayed anyway, however, the guy that burned through stated he could repair it without doing a full respray.

Apparently not

It's funny how manufacturers name their paint colours for different markets, in the UK Aegean Blue is 'Brilliant Sporty Blue' which I'm pretty certain contravenes the Trades Description Act.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've no complaints about the colour matching or blending;

View attachment 32276

After the dealership refused to deal with it I was all set to have it resprayed anyway, however, the guy that burned through stated he could repair it without doing a full respray.

Apparently not

It's funny how manufacturers name their paint colours for different markets, in the UK Aegean Blue is 'Brilliant Sporty Blue' which I'm pretty certain contravenes the Trades Description Act.
Wow. That's actually a really great match. It's perfect from what I can tell. Hopefully I can find a good painter too if I ever need to respray it. Hopefully not though. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You need to apply purpose made ceramic, the kind that requires prep and a day to cure.
Yah, those "ceramic waxes" are so marketing gimmics it seems. But I have to park outside and read that ceramics might not last more than a year if parked outside in the elements. That'd get pretty pricey fast if I had to reapply yearly. ☹

I'm considering clear wrap though. Seems more durable and I like its healing properties. But still won't last too long if constantly parked outside.

Might actually be cheaper to just repaint the whole car 8 years from now or so. lol.
 

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Finally applied a ceramic coating (Armor Shield IX) to my 2021 HR-V EX yesterday. Had it for 2 months (garage kept). The only prep I did aside from several washes to keep it very clean was an iron decontaminate and clay bar followed up with an IPA wipe down. Had to plan it where I knew that I would not need to drive the car for two days to let the coating cure for 48 hours. Did one coat and planned on giving it a second coat the next day but then found out that a second coat must be applied within a few hours as after it has cured (24 to 48 hours) as second would not adhere properly after it has cured and just be a waste of time and money. However, seeing that I don't drive all that much and it's always kept in the garage the coating should, for all practical purposes, last for a few years if properly maintained by keeping it properly washed and a periodic spray silica coating every three months. This will be my first time that I'll be attempting a rinseless wash during the winter months in the garage as there is NO way on earth I'll ever take it to a hand wash facility. So far I only did the body and I'll be giving the windows and the wheels a coating within the next week or so. By the way.... it looks fantastic and at the age of 74 there is no way I can any longer wax a car every few months so I feel this was a great investment and time well spent. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Finally applied a ceramic coating (Armor Shield IX) to my 2021 HR-V EX yesterday. Had it for 2 months (garage kept). The only prep I did aside from several washes to keep it very clean was an iron decontaminate and clay bar followed up with an IPA wipe down. Had to plan it where I knew that I would not need to drive the car for two days to let the coating cure for 48 hours. Did one coat and planned on giving it a second coat the next day but then found out that a second coat must be applied within a few hours as after it has cured (24 to 48 hours) as second would not adhere properly after it has cured and just be a waste of time and money. However, seeing that I don't drive all that much and it's always kept in the garage the coating should, for all practical purposes, last for a few years if properly maintained by keeping it properly washed and a periodic spray silica coating every three months. This will be my first time that I'll be attempting a rinseless wash during the winter months in the garage as there is NO way on earth I'll ever take it to a hand wash facility. So far I only did the body and I'll be giving the windows and the wheels a coating within the next week or so. By the way.... it looks fantastic and at the age of 74 there is no way I can any longer wax a car every few months so I feel this was a great investment and time well spent. :)
Nice! Would love to see pics!

Oh, and I use Meguires Waterless Wash in between full hose washing. Absolutely love the stuff. The Meguires youtube has a good how to on using it to prevent scratches on your car.
 
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