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Discussion Starter #1
Swedish magazine Teknikens Varld tested the Honda CR-V's AWD system, and it didn't do so great. What are the problems?

The new model is not able to climb uphill when the front wheels have no friction. This is a similar problem to that which was found in the previous model of CR-V. A software update from Honda fixed the problem easily though.

Honda responded to this by saying that "its AWD system uses a compact ful-efficient rear differential and its design requires certain torque limitation for the device to work effectively in real conditions.

In real conditions there should usually be friction available for both the front and rear wheels.

Basically the take away is that the CR-V needs a software update.

I also wonder if the HR-V would have the same problem.

 

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No, the take away is that Honda's need a centre diff. Besides it works in real world conditions. You will never ever experience something like front wheels only on rollers in the real world...
 

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For now i'm not going to be too concerned about that, usually i'm the type to wait it out a bit to see what a production model is like especially when it's in it's first year of production in a specific nation. Hopefully it's not an issue that the HRV has as well
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I mean I could see this happening if you get yourself stuck in some icy snow or something. Its not totally impossible. Though grabbing some gravel would fix the problem in that case.
 

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No, the take away is that Honda's need a centre diff. Besides it works in real world conditions. You will never ever experience something like front wheels only on rollers in the real world...
My understanding is that, with a centre diff , the real wheels are engaged permanently, as in the Subaru's. The diff distributes power mechanically to equalize traction.

Honda, to save fuel, does not use a centre diff and has some sort of a clutch, controlled by software, to send power to the rear wheels only if the front wheels are slipping.

In the Swedish experiment, I would have expected the software to engage the rear wheels as the front wheels were slipping. In my experience, having both front wheels on ice is a real world situation - this is precisely when we need AWD. May be Honda is saying, that ice is never as slippery as free rollers.

It would be nice if the user had a control to override the software threshold and force power to the rear wheels.
 

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May be Honda is saying, that ice is never as slippery as free rollers. It would be nice if the user had a control to override the software threshold and force power to the rear wheels.
It is possible to walk on ice but not on free rollers. Also, the HR-V has a Sport mode for which fuel efficiency is not the prime concern. Would Honda use a different AWD threshold in Sport mode? If that was the case, the owner manual should advise using Sport mode in slippery conditions, which is counter-intuitive. I will have a look at the CR-V owner manual.

Did the Swedish experiment test Sport mode?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The evidence would seem to support that. Too bad really. I would have liked to have had a sport mode to play with.
 

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Honda's answer - software upgrade for Sweden only !

Here is the full Honda answer:
http://teknikensvarld.se/honda-cr-v-4wd-system-is-not-working-again-163708/

Their language is somewhat obscure but their logic is very obscure.

First they say that the test is not realistic and that to apply traction to the rear wheels in such an extreme condition would cause overheating - disappointing but fair enough - if you want a better AWD buy something else.

Then they say that all 2015 CR-Vs already benefit from a software upgrade. It seems that the 2014 upgrade was more effective - why not do the same for 2015? Was the 2014 upgrade causing overheating?

Finally they say that the Swedish market will benefit from a (further) upgrade - why not the other markets? Sweden is not the only market with ice (and with testers).
 

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My understanding is that, with a centre diff , the real wheels are engaged permanently, as in the Subaru's. The diff distributes power mechanically to equalize traction.

Honda, to save fuel, does not use a centre diff and has some sort of a clutch, controlled by software, to send power to the rear wheels only if the front wheels are slipping.

In the Swedish experiment, I would have expected the software to engage the rear wheels as the front wheels were slipping. In my experience, having both front wheels on ice is a real world situation - this is precisely when we need AWD. May be Honda is saying, that ice is never as slippery as free rollers.

It would be nice if the user had a control to override the software threshold and force power to the rear wheels.
Jeep has an intersting system they debuted just last year on KL cherokee and now renegade. Its a complete decoupling of the rear wheels when AWD is not needed, so you get the benefits without the drawbacks. (ok there is still SOME mechanical loss but not to the degree as permanent connection IMO)
 

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and now they want to come out with some $70k SUV from what I last heard, looks like Jeep is all over the place with their vehicles.
 
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