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It seems like they have one model, the SDL-A

Tires-easy has 104 reviews, average is 4.9/5

Simple tire has 24 reviews, average for snow is 4/5

Mavis tires has 13 reviews, average for snow and ice is 9/10

All these people (verified purchases) think their tires are good and would survive a situation like OP. I’m saying they’re wrong and OP is proof of this. No strawman
 

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All these people (verified purchases) think their tires are good and would survive a situation like OP. I’m saying they’re wrong and OP is proof of this. No strawman
I had a whole lengthy post but instead, I'll say this...

It doesn't really prove anything. A terrible driver will still crash in the most ideal situation, even if given the best environment and setup. A better driver can and WILL determine what it is they can or cannot actually handle while using decent tires.

~ ~ ~

As a remnant of my lengthy post, I'll say this... I drove through the northern Chicago suburb in a 2010 Honda Fit, lowered on Swift Springs and factory Dunlop tires in the blizzard of early 2011. I made it home fine.

As far as I can recall, I've only ever driven on all-season tires and I usually struggle more with getting moving, than stopping (due to most being FWD and one being RWD).

edit: I will say this... as soon as its feasible, I'm thinking of getting the MICHELIN CrossClimate+.
 

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You’re right but we can’t all be great drivers.

Every day I see nuttiness on the road.

Here’s an example: it’s an icy day and another driver runs a red in your direction.

With all weather or snow tires, the stopping distance is significantly better. The difference could save you from crashing, just like the difference could have saved OP.

OP drives in Pennsylvania where the weather is frequently cold and the roads can be icy.

The chances of him encountering a difficult situation is high and so all season tires should be avoided.

Your area sounds more mild and so unless you’re encountering something like a pile up in white out conditions, then you’re probably fine with all seasons.

The chance is still there and eventually a difficult situation will come up, which is why I don’t think all seasons are appropriate to be recommended anywhere there’s snow.

Good to hear you’re considering the CrossClimate+
 

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I'm not sure how mild you can consider Northeastern Illinois, ie Chicago.

While I won't say it can compare to the far north, I'm fairly certain it can be just as bad as any other snow belt state.
 

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drove through the northern Chicago suburb in a 2010 Honda Fit, lowered on Swift Springs and factory Dunlop tires in the blizzard of early 2011. I made it home fine.

I had a Fit back then and also drove in the same storm. My usually 40 min 30+ miles drive took 2+ hours. I got stuck less 1/4 miles from home because my subdivision wasn't plowed. Not much one can do when snow is higher than Fit's ground clearance. I had to dig out my car the next day.
30040


I never had snow tire on any of my cars. The roads I travel on get cleared within 12 hours of a storm. I just need enough traction to get home if I get caught in storm.
 

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What was this thread about again?! :)


If anyone is checking tires for the M&S designation and thinks they are adequate, they just don't have tire technical skills.
For example, just have a look at the lame, mild Michelin Primacy summer tires that come with the HRV.
They are stamped M & S. No one should be using those in mud and definitely not snow.
The M & S designation is meaningless.


We drive a ton in the winter over the B.C. and Alberta mountain passes.

Lately in B.C., law enforcement seems to do a "soft" road closure at times of heavy snow.
The highway is designated closed but if you pull up and talk to them, they seem to have a formal checklist before letting you through.
They have checked us out a few times this year before letting us carry on.

Just off the top of my head, they checked:

  • Winter tires, with plenty of tread and the "Snowflake" symbol.
  • snow shovel
  • nearly full tank of gas
  • cell phone
  • cell phone charger
  • winter clothes, gloves, boots, etc and blankets
  • jumper cables
  • bottled water

The worse the roads, the better the skiing! And this list keeps the stupid city folks off the winter roads... :)
 

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M&S tires have more agressive tread than traditional "summer tires", but the rubber can become hard in lo temps..true winter tires (with the mountain & snnowflake symbol) has morre aggressive tread yet, and the rubber remains soft in lo temps..I find nothing about the rubber wearing faster in the summer, but I suspect they do a little..but they have no mileage warranty, and are not usually seen in the summer
 

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For example, just have a look at the lame, mild Michelin Primacy summer tires that come with the HRV.
The Michelins that come with HRV are not summer tires. They are all season. Summer tires are high performance tires. I guess tires you guys in Canada dont use in the winter are summer tires.
 

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The Michelins that come with HRV are not summer tires. They are all season. Summer tires are high performance tires. I guess tires you guys in Canada dont use in the winter are summer tires.

IMO, there is no such thing as All-season tires.
As mentioned, "All-season" is a non-technical marketing term used by tire manufacturers as is "M & S".
Both terms are meaningless.
"3 season" is a much more accurate term and I see that term used more and more instead of All-season.
"All weather" is a technical term and completely different than "All season".


The Michelin Primacy MXV4 tire that comes on the North American HRV is absolutely a summer tire.

  • mild, rib type, tread pattern. Poor handling, poor traction but quiet and low rolling resistance.
  • very shallow tread (9.5/32"). Poor traction, less cost.
  • very hard rubber tread (UTQG 500AA). Poor traction, extends tire life.
  • super lightweight, light duty. Thin carcass and thin sidewall, no rim guard. Less cost, mushy handling, greater fuel economy.

High performance tires are entirely other discussion.
 

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A tire type is not determined by the weather outside your window. Naming them all season type tires make much more sense to most than all weather tires, and I doubt tire manufacturers and tire stores will name tires what you want. The OEM Michelin MX4 tires are most certainly all season tires.. in fact, they are expensive and good tires. I have driven in the snow for 45 years, and am impressed by their traction in the snow
 

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A tire type is not determined by the weather outside your window.
So in Quebec, it’s mandatory for the whole province to have winter tires from December 1st to March 15th.

They understand that all seasons do not have the same stopping power in temperatures under 7C / 44F.

This is because the compound hardens so maybe your tires are good in snow but they’re not good for all the situations you might encounter during winter.

That is what winter tires or good all weather tires are for.
 

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I always enjoy a technical discussion (20 year I/T background) and I never have a problem agreeing to disagree!

As Michael mentioned, the HRV OEM Michelin all season/summer tires would never be allowed in jurisdictions like Quebec that require tires with the Snowflake symbol nor would they pass an Alberta/B.C. police roadside winter tire check.
They don't perform well nor do they have good traction nor are safe in cold weather nor in snow.

If you go back to the 1st post of this thread, you can see how good all season/summer tires are in the winter. :)



To take the analysis of the HRV OEM Michelin Primacy MXV4 further, what about this tire in the summer on pavement?
  • mild, rib type, tread pattern. Poor handling, poor traction, average in rain, but quiet and low rolling resistance.
  • very shallow tread (9.5/32"). A shallow tread actually helps handling on dry pavement.
  • very hard rubber tread (UTQG 500AA). Poor traction even on dry pavement, extends tire life.
  • super lightweight, light duty. Thin carcass and thin sidewall, no rim guard. Less cost, mushy handling, greater fuel economy.
So you can see that the HRV OEM Michelin tire is a low cost, low performing, quiet, fuel economy summer tire that is great for the average commuter that doesn't care about handling or performance.
Its a "Grandma" compromise tire that doesn't do anything well.

One can also see that having dedicated winter tires, higher profile, narrower, on narrower and smaller diameter wheels is best for the winter.
Then having wider, softer, stiffer, aggressive tread pattern, low profile, dedicated summer tires on wider, larger diameter wheels is best for summer performance.


And this is why we have so many wheels and tires for our 4 vehicles, which drives my wife nuts!

I should clarify, I have never driven my Mustang in the snow ever. It has 4 street wheels and tires, 4 drag race wheels and tires and 4 road race/autocross wheels and tires. :)
 

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I live in Ontario, Canada. The day after I got my HRV EX-L, I spun out in the snow and ice on the way to pickup snow tires... There was a curve in the road I didn't expect (I didn't know the area) which forced me to turn quickly causing the HRV to slide and spin out. Luckily I didn't hit any vehicles or curbs or anything as I ended up on the other side of the road.

I found that without good snow tires, AWD does next to nothing. I got the best of the best in winter tires and now have Bridgestone Blizzak tires on. Haven't slid since and feel very confident driving now.
 

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I found that without good snow tires, AWD does next to nothing. I got the best of the best in winter tires and now have Bridgestone Blizzak tires on. Haven't slid since and feel very confident driving now.
Hopefully one day, all weather will be the standard on new cars instead of all seasons so accidents can be avoided.
 
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