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Ok, I have never had a CVT and I have never used one in sport mode. Is it just for fun? Does it add any real performance? If I understand correctly, you can't actually shift to a gear that isn't good (so no sudden multiple downshifts)

I assume if you do nothing it will still shift as you accelerate?

Do you even see a gear setting anywhere? Do you know what pretend gear you are in?

If you use one (or have one and ignore it) - let me know, I would be interested in hearing what you think of it.

Thanks
 

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Depends on who made the CVT. I've driven a Nissan Rogue with a CVT and really liked it. Here's a weird factoid. CVT software designers put artificial jerks into the system to reassure Neanderthal humans (us) that the transmission is actually working. By design, a CVT doesn't have those, but people freaked out and thought they were broken. Is that weird or what?
 

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It is just for fun and play, I've used it maybe once. It doesn't add to performance and I think gives you worse gas mileage.
 

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http://autoweek.com/article/car-reviews/gateway-drug-2016-honda-hr-v-first-drive

Here is a great review that talks alot about the CVT:

"The CVT is programmed with seven step ranges, and Honda’s G Design Shift Control is intended to mimic a conventional automatic under hard acceleration by allowing the engine to rev to its horsepower peak before the ratio changes. Higher-trim HR-Vs feature a Sport mode and paddle shifters for manual step changes. All CVTs have an ECON button that introduces three alterations; reduced rate of throttle application between about 10 percent and 60 percent of pedal travel, cruise control that maintains speed less aggressively on uneven terrain, and more economical AC operation.

The CVT just squeezes a lot of joy out of a nice little engine. Honda’s remains one of the better CVTs offered, and the control logic is further improved in this one. In certain, limited circumstances the HR-V feels almost like it has a conventional automatic, but that only makes us dislike CVTs slightly less. The only way to banish that stretchy, droning sensation is to work the CVT steps manually just about all the time, and if one plans to do that there’s no reason to choose the CVT to begin with.

Do I want it?

Do you want a little Honda SUV? We boldly predict that there are many, many thousands of car buyers who do.


Presumably these people want the same thing as CR-V buyers. They just have less cash to get started. They want a vehicle that fills every role—economical commuting, easy parking, functionality for a camping trip, space for the dog or a couple of kids or friends—and they don’t want the vehicle to bore them. They’d like it to seem sort of cool, and they don’t want to fear the elements.
The HR-V gets it all done, and it will be doing it while other big, go-to manufacturers like Toyota, Ford and Hyundai aren’t yet an option. Whether you want it or not, we’re having a hard time finding reasons to think the HR-V can go wrong."



Ok, I have never had a CVT and I have never used one in sport mode. Is it just for fun? Does it add any real performance? If I understand correctly, you can't actually shift to a gear that isn't good (so no sudden multiple downshifts)

I assume if you do nothing it will still shift as you accelerate?

Do you even see a gear setting anywhere? Do you know what pretend gear you are in?

If you use one (or have one and ignore it) - let me know, I would be interested in hearing what you think of it.

Thanks
 

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Another interesting quote from the same article:
It’s a minority opinion, perhaps, but in the HR-V we’d forgo the all-wheel-drive to keep the manual (and maybe our sanity). We’re enormously pleased that Honda offers a manual to begin with, because even in this class it’s no longer a given. The GM twins and the forthcoming Mazda CX-3 do not have a manual option.
About half the articles I've read dis the manual, another half dis the cvt. Some of those that preferred the cvt still dislike cvt's in general; a couple called this cvt the best of a bad breed... i.e. they don't like cvt's, but dislike this one less.

In the end it's all personal preference after test drives, and also the relative importance to you of awd. The majority sold in US will be cvt; the majority in Europe will probably be manual. Canada will likely be more cvts, partly for the awd, though maybe higher proportion of manuals here than in the states.

I want a manual. If the hrv in manual doesn't impress me, I'll be looking at other cars, likely giving up the CUV driving height and cargo volume. I'm not looking for sports-car performance, just a car that's engaging and fun to drive.
 
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