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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For those that are monitoring CVT trans temps, what kind of temps are you seeing?

The HRV CVT trans has only 1 cooler, a fluid to fluid cooler shared with the engine.
In slow speed driving, with no air flow, the engine will go to 200F+/100C+ until the thermoswitch/ECU turns on the radiator fans.
So given enough slow speed, stop and go driving, the CVT trans will also go to 200F+ but this no big deal because there is no load on the trans at this time.

We just did a long trip in our HRV, fully loaded with all our ski gear.
Our CVT trans will go to 210F up a long highway hill (mountain pass), ambient temps ranging around -10C/14F.
The trans temp will likely go higher but we slow down when the trans temp hits 210F.
During this time the engine runs about 190-195F.
This tells me that the CVT trans cooler is inadequate.


This is too hot for comfort for me and I'm now shopping for an aftermarket air to air trans cooler.
A bit of research shows that the Subaru guys regularily install an aftermarket CVT trans cooler.

I don't think anyone on this forum has installed an aftermarket trans cooler on their HRV CVT.


Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
So we did another ski trip in our HRV and I'm driving it around much more now that we are on vacation.
Ambients temps were quite warm, 32F/0C. Too warm for skiing but that's a different discussion!

I can clearly see that the HRV CVT trans runs cooler in Sport mode than in Drive mode.
This raises the engine RPM at highway speed (60mph/100 km/hr) but the trans will slowly cool down from over 200F on a long highway hill to down to 190F.
Even around town I can see the difference.

I'm guessing that Sport mode keeps the torque converter locked up longer than when in Drive.
An unlocked torque converter shears the fluid and generates heat.
In a traditional automatic trans, higher engine RPM spins the auto trans oil pump faster, increasing line pressures that keeps the trans from slipping.
But I don't know if the HRV CVT trans even has an oil pump.

I hate the way the CVT trans in Drive lugs the engine around 2000rpm and I normally drive around town in Sport mode anyway.
Lugging any engine is not good for it plus it makes for sluggish response. The HRV engine has very little torque below 3500 rpm.
 

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This is too hot for comfort for me and I'm now shopping for an aftermarket air to air trans cooler.
A bit of research shows that the Subaru guys regularily install an aftermarket CVT trans cooler.

I don't think anyone on this forum has installed an aftermarket trans cooler on their HRV CVT.


Thoughts?
PRLMotorsports makes a CVT cooler for 2016+ civics.
2016+ Civic 1.5T CVT Cooler Kit

If I understand the instructions correctly, the cooler is mounted next to the radiator but the fluid is routed to the CVT via the CVT warmer.
PRL Motorsports 2016+ Civic 1.5T CVT Cooler Install - PRL Army Blog

Both the Civic and the HRV share the same CVT warmer (part# 25560-R3W-003) so in theory, this cooler should also be compatible with the HRV
Warmer, Cvtf - Honda (25560-R3W-003) | Honda Parts Cheap
 

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you could also message on facebook “go garage my”

He’s a Malaysian vendor whose very knowledgeable about the HRV.

Temperatures in Asia are a lot higher than here so if there’s an alternative to that PRLmotorsports one, he’ll know.
 

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For those that are monitoring CVT trans temps, what kind of temps are you seeing?

The HRV CVT trans has only 1 cooler, a fluid to fluid cooler shared with the engine.
In slow speed driving, with no air flow, the engine will go to 200F+/100C+ until the thermoswitch/ECU turns on the radiator fans.
So given enough slow speed, stop and go driving, the CVT trans will also go to 200F+ but this no big deal because there is no load on the trans at this time.

We just did a long trip in our HRV, fully loaded with all our ski gear.
Our CVT trans will go to 210F up a long highway hill (mountain pass), ambient temps ranging around -10C/14F.
The trans temp will likely go higher but we slow down when the trans temp hits 210F.
During this time the engine runs about 190-195F.
This tells me that the CVT trans cooler is inadequate.


This is too hot for comfort for me and I'm now shopping for an aftermarket air to air trans cooler.
A bit of research shows that the Subaru guys regularily install an aftermarket CVT trans cooler.

I don't think anyone on this forum has installed an aftermarket trans cooler on their HRV CVT.


Thoughts?
Where do you monitor the transmission temp? (2016 HRV)
 

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Wireless OBD reader + mobile app

The reader sells for about $20 on amazon and it plugs into a port on the driver side.

It’ll connect to your phone and you can see live stats while driving

It’s also a good idea to have one around so you can check the codes if ever one were to come up
 

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Wireless OBD reader + mobile app

The reader sells for about $20 on amazon and it plugs into a port on the driver side.

It’ll connect to your phone and you can see live stats while driving

It’s also a good idea to have one around so you can check the codes if ever one were to come up
What is the brand?
 

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Do you use android or iPhone?

If I’m not mistaken, androids use a Bluetooth version and iPhones require a wifi version
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As per this thread, I'm using a Scangauge to monitor CVT trans temp, voltage and engine temp.


Monitoring these 3 critical engine parameters is extremely useful, since the HRV has no in-dash engine gauges.
The Scangauge is a good quality, flexible device. Current cost about US$100.

My OBD scanners will not read CVT trans temp so I am surprised that Michael was able to get his bluetooth/cell phone app OBD reader to read CVT trans temp.
There are tons of bluetooth OBD readers which have their advantages but not my choice for permanent engine gauges.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
PRLMotorsports makes a CVT cooler for 2016+ civics.
2016+ Civic 1.5T CVT Cooler Kit

If I understand the instructions correctly, the cooler is mounted next to the radiator but the fluid is routed to the CVT via the CVT warmer.
PRL Motorsports 2016+ Civic 1.5T CVT Cooler Install - PRL Army Blog

Both the Civic and the HRV share the same CVT warmer (part# 25560-R3W-003) so in theory, this cooler should also be compatible with the HRV
Warmer, Cvtf - Honda (25560-R3W-003) | Honda Parts Cheap

Thanks for the info.

Having a closer look, adding a CVT trans cooler to the HRV is not so simple.
The HRV CVT factory cooler/heater does not have external trans fluid lines like the Subaru CVT cooler/heater.
So one cannot simply add a trans fluid cooler in series with the factory cooler/heater.

That's why the kit you show eliminates the factory HRV CVT cooler/heater with the billet aluminum adapter and why the kit is US$500.

Now I wonder if simply adding a external coolant radiator in series and prior to the CVT cooler/heater would be effective?
This would cool the coolant prior to entering the CVT trans cooler/heater and therefore cool the trans fluid down.
Not nearly as effective as an external trans fluid cooler but much simpler and cheaper.
More research required...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Not sure if anyone on this forum is familiar with Hondata out of California but here is some basic technical analysis of the Civic CVT.
Hopefully Hondata will further analyze the CVT trans.


 
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