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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Well I go on Monday to visit the dealer. I looked at a few HRV on the new car lot and all had the extra dealer charge of undercoating....They all looked at mine. I got a hunch that they do but some in the wheel well were you have some gray metal...It has a black finish to it where they put some stuff on...but if that is called undercoating for 300.00 that is a ripoff ... One can of the stuff you buy at wal mart would do 10 hrv doing it the way they do it at the dealer...They did tell me over the phone that they do not spray the underside anymore because it already has corrosion protection in the metal and the wheel well is where the salt gets splashed up in...So we shall see Monday...Like I said I will do it myself with something like fluid film..
 

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2019 and 2020 HR-V EXs
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The REAR wheel wells have the fibrous-looking liners from the factory. They are NOT metallic.
the wheel well is where the salt gets splashed up in
If you have another dealer nearby, just take a peek at the cars there....for comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
The REAR wheel wells have the fibrous-looking liners from the factory. They are NOT metallic.


If you have another dealer nearby, just take a peek at the cars there....for comparison.
Yes and no... If you look where the rear shock is there is metal behind it...and it has that black coating on it...this is a 20201 model fyi...
 

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2019 HRV EX CVT. 1.5 Earth Dreams. Modern Steel.
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I have a 2021 Honda HRV Sport that I purchased in June. Part of the dealer add on was undercoating 300.00. I changed the oil for the first time a few days ago and noticed the underside is clean and just has the painted metal with no sign of undercoating seen. I amused to the rubberized stuff and you can easily tell if that was done or not. I called the dealer and am waiting for a call back. My question is are there undercoating now that goes on as a clear film??? I think it was never done but just want to be sure of the different types of undercoating vs the one I know the black rubberized stuff I used in the past. This is a USA model..
I've had great respect for Japanese engineering for a number of years, but my recent experience with Honda, Toyota and Mazda suggests that you are wise to get some additional corrosion protection from new. Every year or two thereafter I pressure wash everything I can underneath the car during warm summer weather. The vehicles are then given 48 hours to thoroughly dry, any remaining dirt brushed or scraped off before spraying with Waxoil or a similar product. Any areas that get a lot of direct exposure to water spray from the wheels etc gets Hammerite Underbody Seal with Waxoil, applied thick, with a brush. Both products leave a soft, slightly greasy finish. Waxoil can be bought either in clear or black.
 

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it is a rip off anytime a dealer added extras not from the factory.

Rust proofing is unnecessary now days. The only issue I have with rust were cars from the 80s. those mufflers don't last long.
 

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Rust proofing is unnecessary now days.

I disagree, for several reasons..

In snow areas, the "salt" they use these days is much more corrosive and aggressive than in the past.
No longer do they just use sodium chloride. They now use calcium chloride and potassium chloride and other chemicals.
They now also apply these chemicals in liquid form for road pre-treating, prior to a snow fall.

I also think they use more of these chemicals on the winter roads these days than they used to.
I'm certain that this is cheaper than plowing the snow and the majority of city folks don't use install winter tires these days.

Todays sheet metal is thinner than ever. Check any panel on the HRV. Check any panel on any new vehicle.
Even a new 3/4 ton truck. Paper thin sheet metal, paper thin water based paint.
This thin sheet metal is not going to survive much corrosion. Not like old 50's vehicles that can have a ton of surface rust on thick but still intact sheet metal.

Aluminum body vehicles (for example all F-series trucks for the last several years) have different issues.
Aluminum corrodes differently, dissimilar metal corrosion and the ease at which alumium cracks and dents.


Around here, we see 3 year old vehicles with tons of rust on them. Not unlike days gone by.
In snow areas, one has to do something to prevent corrosion if you want to keep your vehicle for more than a few years.

I suspect that new vehicles with full underbody covering panels (like the HRV) will quietly rust in hidden areas without anyone knowing until a major issue comes up. Only time will tell.
There is no way to wash the underbody or apply some kind of anti-corrosion spray without removing all the panels.
No one is doing that. No dealer is doing that.

Not that anyone keeps vehicles that long anymore...
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I disagree, for several reasons..

In snow areas, the "salt" they use these days is much more corrosive and aggressive than in the past.
No longer do they just use sodium chloride. They now use calcium chloride and potassium chloride and other chemicals.
They now also apply these chemicals in liquid form for road pre-treating, prior to a snow fall.

I also think they use more of these chemicals on the winter roads these days than they used to.
I'm certain that this is cheaper than plowing the snow and the majority of city folks don't use install winter tires these days.

Todays sheet metal is thinner than ever. Check any panel on the HRV. Check any panel on any new vehicle.
Even a new 3/4 ton truck. Paper thin sheet metal, paper thin water based paint.
This thin sheet metal is not going to survive much corrosion. Not like old 50's vehicles that can have a ton of surface rust on thick but still intact sheet metal.

Aluminum body vehicles (for example all F-series trucks for the last several years) have different issues.
Aluminum corrodes differently, dissimilar metal corrosion and the ease at which alumium cracks and dents.


Around here, we see 3 year old vehicles with tons of rust on them. Not unlike days gone by.
In snow areas, one has to do something to prevent corrosion if you want to keep your vehicle for more than a few years.

I suspect that new vehicles with full underbody covering panels (like the HRV) will quietly rust in hidden areas without anyone knowing until a major issue comes up. Only time will tell.
There is no way to wash the underbody or apply some kind of anti-corrosion spray without removing all the panels.
No one is doing that. No dealer is doing that.

Not that anyone keeps vehicles that long anymore...
The problem is the old style rubberized black undercoating really is not the choice anymore as they sometimes make things worse in the long run. I guess the oil/wax type seem to be the best rated right now..
 

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The problem is the old style rubberized black undercoating really is not the choice anymore as they sometimes make things worse in the long run. I guess the oil/wax type seem to be the best rated right now..

What part of the US do you live in?
Knowing your location and the amount of snowfall in your area would help with this discussion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
What part of the US do you live in?
Knowing your location and the amount of snowfall in your area would help with this discussion.
Louisville KY We have about 20 inches a year...but I grew up in Cleveland OH and remember when Dad got his new car every 2 to three years the first stop was getting it rustproofed and back then it was the thick black tar stuff they sprayed underneath and the lighter stuff they would drill holes and spay in and then put a small round plastic plud over the whole they drilled...
 

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I disagree, for several reasons..

In snow areas, the "salt" they use these days is much more corrosive and aggressive than in the past.
No longer do they just use sodium chloride. They now use calcium chloride and potassium chloride and other chemicals.
They now also apply these chemicals in liquid form for road pre-treating, prior to a snowfall.

I live in a snow area all my driving life. I'm not seeing the effect any worst than in the past. The cars are actually getting better against rust issues. I don't have any issue with cars I had since 2000. I do wash my cars when the weather gets nice in the winter after a snowfall.

Do you mean the many parallel lines left on the roads from the sprays just before the snowfall? we have those here too.

None of my cars have ever been rust-proofed.

Plant Hood Sky Road surface Car
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited by Moderator)
I live in a snow area all my driving life. I'm not seeing the effect any worst than in the past. The cars are actually getting better against rust issues. I don't have any issue with cars I had since 2000. I do wash my cars when the weather gets nice in the winter after a snowfall.

Do you mean the many parallel lines left on the roads from the sprays just before the snowfall? we have those here too.

None of my cars have ever been rust-proofed.

View attachment 33042
I tend to agree with you based on my previous accord that was clean underneath.....I guess my main issue is being charged 300.00 for undercoating and not getting it or just some spot treatment under each wheel well...
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Well here is what happened... They agreed that it was not a very good job...but they only do the wheel wells and not underneath....and from what I have been reading I am glad of that. The old way of rubberized stuff is bad for your underside...at the time it may have been good but the newer oil type film is much better...They wrote me a check for 295.00 for what I was charged for the so called undercoating...Now I will get some cans of fluid film type stuff and do it myself..
 

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Well here is what happened... They agreed that it was not a very good job...but they only do the wheel wells and not underneath....and from what I have been reading I am glad of that. The old way of rubberized stuff is bad for your underside...at the time it may have been good but the newer oil type film is much better...They wrote me a check for 295.00 for what I was charged for the so called undercoating...Now I will get some cans of fluid film type stuff and do it myself..
Glad they did you right. ☺
 
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