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Just as an FYI you can disable your DRLs and there are no ill effects. I pulled the fuse and tested it to see if there were any problems or warning lights or anything and there were not, everything works as it should just no DRLs which I personally dislike so I got rid of them. Then I reused the fuse position for my add a circuit and hard wired my wife's radar detector. Now no wires show at all and the dumb dim yellow DRLs are gone. I am pleased with my evenings work.

Disable them on every vehicle I can, like them on motorcycles not on cars.
 

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Just as an FYI you can disable your DRLs and there are no ill effects. I pulled the fuse and tested it to see if there were any problems or warning lights or anything and there were not, everything works as it should just no DRLs which I personally dislike so I got rid of them. Then I reused the fuse position for my add a circuit and hard wired my wife's radar detector. Now no wires show at all and the dumb dim yellow DRLs are gone. I am pleased with my evenings work.

Disable them on every vehicle I can, like them on motorcycles not on cars.
Your post made me smile. I remember way back when the Toyota Matrix came out. It seemed like everyone on the forum was trying to figure out how to disabled them because they hated them too.
 

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Your post made me smile. I remember way back when the Toyota Matrix came out. It seemed like everyone on the forum was trying to figure out how to disabled them because they hated them too.
Good to know I'm not just crazy for hating them lol. I was looking at the Toyota Matrix last night actually, looking for my daughter that will soon be needing a inexpensive reliable first car. Dad is suddenly much more concerned about different things when buying for his daughter than for himself..... Safety, reliability, are now first and not raw speed. Strange huh?
 

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Glad you posted, was thinking this morning in my way into work about doing the exact same thing. I'm in the military where we are supposed to dim our headlights when pulling up to the gate. And guess what pops on when the headlights are dimmed? Those fricken DRL's!, which are the high beams with reduced wattage to the bulb!
 

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Just as an FYI you can disable your DRLs and there are no ill effects. I pulled the fuse and tested it to see if there were any problems or warning lights or anything and there were not, everything works as it should just no DRLs which I personally dislike so I got rid of them. Then I reused the fuse position for my add a circuit and hard wired my wife's radar detector. Now no wires show at all and the dumb dim yellow DRLs are gone. I am pleased with my evenings work.

Disable them on every vehicle I can, like them on motorcycles not on cars.
Interesting, in Canada and Europe they are the law. Disabling them will cost us big bucks if caught. They are proven to save lives.

I have a pet peeve with people who drive around with their fog lights on no matter what the weather or time of day. Basically they are posing. In Europe it is an offense to use your fog lights unless the weather dictates it's appropriate.

Different on a bike. Be seen and be heard. First thing I did on my Harley was knock out the exhaust baffles :D
 

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I just want to figure out how to keep the fog lights on when I use the Hi-beams, why would they set the fog lights up to turn off :confused:
Two different lighting effects that have different lighting results in various weather conditions. Example, usually hi-beams in a snow storm or heavy fog do more harm than good.
 

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I think DRLs are a horrible invention. I see people almost daily driving after dark with no light on, the DRL is on so they have no clue thay they never turned on the lights. No taillights or marker lights while driving on the freeway. Morons. Can they save lives, maybe. People that do no turn on headlights in the rain and fog I guess, but broad daylight no difference at least as tested in the US.

Now, I think all cars should have auto headlights and you should not be able to disable the feature. That would solve the no light drivers and people that wait until dead dark to ever fire up the headlights, no light fog drivers and all would be solved. Love that feature and it should be mandated. I also think that the new HR-V feature where after the wipers are on for 30 seconds or whatever it is that the lights then come on. That should also be a standard safety feature, around here more than half the average cars in a massive rain storm will not have the headlights on. Both features are amazing and should be standard for sure. Those two features should have been standard way before back up cameras, they are required here now and while there were 6-8 people a year killed in backup accidents I'd wager there were more hurt by no lights on in bad conditions easily but that would be hard to investigate I imagine.

DRLs though, they suck and I hate them. There is no point to them and I will remove them whenever possible!
 

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Two different lighting effects that have different lighting results in various weather conditions. Example, usually hi-beams in a snow storm or heavy fog do more harm than good.
I run with my fog/driving light on all the time in my Ridgeline. The driving light project nice and wide. When my high beams are on I lose that side light. I live in deer country and lose the advantage with my high beams on if that makes any sense...
 

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My first car had DRL and I haven't had them in over 10 years. Since then I always drove with lights on then again when you drive a silver Fit you need all the lights you could get to avoid being hit by Ameri-Trucks that forget to look down when they change lanes.
 

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I seemed to have stirred up a bit of a hornets nest. DRL's are a bit like Politics, gun control, religion etc. Lots of varying views. They are not mandated in the U.S. as they are in many countries. Studies where mandated like Canada, Australia, Europe and Scandinavia indicate double digit reductions in:

daytime multi-vehicle fatal crashes. (U.S. 2013. 32,719)
daytime fatal pedestrian crashes. (U.S. 2013. 4,743)
daytime multi-vehicle injury crashes. (US 2013. 2,239,000)
daytime Multi-vehicle property crashes

Use of fog lights during daytime creates glare under normal ambient light conditions and results in discomfort and distraction to other road users.

DRL's are particularly effective in reducing head on crashes.

The estimated cost of bulb replacement and fuel for DRL's is $7.00 per year.

Sorry if I have created a fuss. There are a lot of differing thoughts on DRL's but for me I'm glad I have them.
 

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I was so excited to get DRLs. I had gotten in the habit of driving with my lights on almost all the time. So nice to have them and the auto headlights. To each their own - glad you found a simple solution.
 

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The DRLs are a bit 'blingy', but if they remotely prevent accidents, they are an asset.
I know they would probably be too low to be 100% effective, but could the fog lights be replaced with a spot of some type, presuming a suitable size is available for placement in the same location?
 

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I seemed to have stirred up a bit of a hornets nest. DRL's are a bit like Politics, gun control, religion etc. Lots of varying views. They are not mandated in the U.S. as they are in many countries. Studies where mandated like Canada, Australia, Europe and Scandinavia indicate double digit reductions in:

daytime multi-vehicle fatal crashes. (U.S. 2013. 32,719)
daytime fatal pedestrian crashes. (U.S. 2013. 4,743)
daytime multi-vehicle injury crashes. (US 2013. 2,239,000)
daytime Multi-vehicle property crashes

Use of fog lights during daytime creates glare under normal ambient light conditions and results in discomfort and distraction to other road users.

DRL's are particularly effective in reducing head on crashes.

The estimated cost of bulb replacement and fuel for DRL's is $7.00 per year.

Sorry if I have created a fuss. There are a lot of differing thoughts on DRL's but for me I'm glad I have them.
They are mandatory in Canada, and I appreciate them.
Probably not as big an issue in the US with all the super divided highways, but up here most our highways are not divided.

When you go out to pass someone on a grey day, then you realize someone driving a grey car is coming toward you with no lights on, you wish all cars had DRL's!
 

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They are mandatory in Canada, and I appreciate them.
Probably not as big an issue in the US with all the super divided highways, but up here most our highways are not divided.

When you go out to pass someone on a grey day, then you realize someone driving a grey car is coming toward you with no lights on, you wish all cars had DRL's!
I am old enough to remember a) when the interstate system was not yet complete, and b) when driving, and having someone coming towards you with their headlights on during the day, usually in the early morning, we would flash them to let them know their headlights were on (thinking we were doing them a favor).

Things got confusing when cars started coming with the daytime running lights, and drivers stopped flashing others (now that means their is a speed trap ahead).

I do like the auto headlights thing. And I also like the auto window washing thing where if you have your windshield wipers on and go into reverse, your back wiper goes on as well.

Most recently I discovered the turn signal thing where if you just push on your turn signal a little, it will flash 3 times automatically.

I wonder who has the job of sitting around thinking of all these cool things....
 

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Agree with CdnColin on DRLs, and with Razer on auto headlights!

I think the combination of DRLs and always-on instrument lighting have led to the huge increase in lightless after-dark drivers. You used to at least remember the headlights when it became hard to read the speedo; not so anymore. The DRLs give some illumination up front so it's less obvious the lights aren't on, and may convince some of lesser intelligence that they don't need the headlights.

But that's not a problem with the DRLs, it's an unfinished system. When one part of a system is self-managing (DRLs and interior lights), so that there's no human engagement, it's more likely that the required manual input will be missed.

<off-topic>
This is the problem I see with all of the assistive technology, like lane-keeping, adaptive cruise, blind spot etc. The operators become so used to the nanny that it's harder for them to stay engaged and alert and properly responsive for the part of the process they're responsible for.

I think we're in a dangerous period between fully manual and fully autonomous cars. Tesla will soon have a model with freeway "autopilot": like adaptive cruise plus auto steering plus nav to put you in the right lane. They say it still requires an alert driver ready to take over... what are the chances?? I've seen first hand how that works on the waterways, with gps autopilots driving the boats while "skippers" hold cocktail parties on the back deck. I've seen several very close calls, and that's in wide-open waters with modest traffic and speeds under 20kts.

I love to drive, love the engagement of full manual control, but the sooner all vehicles are autonomous the safer we'll all be. Hopefully the real driving experience will still be available on tracks and closed courses.
</off-topic>
 

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"A 2008 study by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration analysed the effect of DRLs on frontal and side-on crashes between two vehicles and on vehicle collisions with pedestrians, cyclists, and motorcyclists. The analysis determined that DRLs offer no statistically significant reduction in the frequency or severity of the collisions studied, except for a reduction in light trucks' and vans' involvement in two-vehicle crashes by a statistically significant 5.7%."

"The daytime running light was first mandated, and safety benefits first perceived, in Scandinavian countries where it is persistently dark during the winter season. As ambient light levels increase, the potential safety benefit decreases while the DRL intensity required for a safety improvement increases. The safety benefit produced by DRLs in relatively dark Nordic countries is roughly triple the benefit observed in relatively bright America."
 
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