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Its the tires, they are garbage - the French make crappy tires, so do the Italians - I only buy German and Japanese tires - perhaps unsurprisingly they build them like they build there cars, for road use. The problem is dunlop, michelin and pirrelli are numbers companies, initial grip, mileage etc - but what happens when the road is imperfect of there is only 50% tread left - bin them. Continentals are comfortable and you can heat cycle them down to the cords and they will stay consistent - with 4/32nds my primacys are like driving on soap.

The tire is the initial means of dampening, having a square profile, stiff tread and sidewall for mileage is going to make matters worse.

The HRV has a much stiffer chasis than an older civic so the spring rates can be lower and in some instances that means the ride will be better but initial shunts like potholes will not absorb through crappy tires. Lighter rims and better tires can get the same or better levels of performance with a much better ride.
 

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Hondas specialize in road feel.
I beg to differ. In my opinion, Honda makes great transportation appliances. The Mazda3 I traded in for my HR-V had a much more controlled ride with 200,000 miles on its suspension than the HR-V did with 9 miles on its suspension. And no, it hasn't gotten better (or worse) as the suspension broke in.

But we're talking a $26,000 (back in 2007) car with multilink rear suspension versus a $20,000 car (in 2016) with a torsion beam. My chief complaint is that the ride is bouncy, but eh, it's a $20,000 econo-car. I'm not expecting a cloud-like ride.

Mazda, for a while anyway, sacrificed everything to make a driver's car. Cargo capacity, rear passenger leg room, cruising range, etc. Small cars have a finite amount of space to package everything. It's hard to fit a multilink suspension and large fuel tank and have decent rear leg room and trunk space.

Continentals are comfortable and you can heat cycle them down to the cords and they will stay consistent
They definitely are comfortable. I had Continental PureContact with EcoPlus Technology (made in Brazil) on the Mazda3.

I got Cooper CS5 UltraTouring (made in USA) installed on the HR-V. I don't drive the car hard enough to notice a difference between those and the Michelins. I'm pretty proactive about replacing tires anyway. I change them once they're 6 years old or hit 4/32 tread.
 

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Continental had some cutting edge custom designed testing and manufacturing, they have factories in Brazil for labor and tax costs but all of the engineering compounds and testing comes out of Germany, I really wish they were making sport bike tires while I was still riding, the tires on my s2000 and tsx were phenomenal same as all of the cars before them. I’m installing the terrain contact hrs on Saturday when my rims arrive and I can’t wait, so over these Michelin’s. I talked to my friend at tire rack and he said the terrain contacts are his #1 recommendation next being the coopers, the 600000 mile guarantee is awesome, at 2/32nds they give you 33% credit In a new pair.
 

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My 2019 Sport feels a bit bumpy, but that is mostly over the cattle guards near my home. Speed limit is 45 mph and you get bounced around some going over those.
 

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I agree, the HR-V handling is nimble and responsive but its ride is a bumpy one. Even small irregularities in the road —a man-hole cover that's an inch proud of the pavement or a very shallow pothole, 1-2 inches deep— and you feel like you're off-roading in Baja. Hit a big pothole, and it's spine-jarring. I have two cars to compare it to. A 2003 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport that I drive to work and a 2005 Ford Escape that we traded in when we leased the 2018 HR-V. Most comfortable ride, hands down, the Ford Escape. It had the most supportive seats by far and was the best over bumps and potholes. The Subaru's seats, by contrast, are too spongy and they give me lower back pain on longer rides but it takes bumps better than the HR-V does. The HR-V is the nimblest; it has the most pep; and it wins in the cargo space and gas mileage categories. I could probably live with the jostling ride if I lived in a part of the country that never sees snow and ice; but Pennsylvania has too many big potholes to deal with come winter. I'd like an HR-V with bigger wheels, tires with higher sidewalls, and a more robust suspension.
 

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First, I love my HRV but have a couple of complaints. My biggest is this vehicle doesn't seem to take bumps or potholes too well. Some have told me because the SUV is higher up it will have a bumpy ride. However, I've driven other larger SUV's and never had this issue. It feels like I'm driving an old car that needs new shocks. Does anyone else notice this or is it just me?
Hi Jim! Did you ever find a solution to this? Just bought a 2018 and thinking of buying new tires like continental
 
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