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Its the tires, they are garbage - the French make crappy tires, so do the Italians - I only buy German and Japanese tires - perhaps unsurprisingly they build them like they build there cars, for road use. The problem is dunlop, michelin and pirrelli are numbers companies, initial grip, mileage etc - but what happens when the road is imperfect of there is only 50% tread left - bin them. Continentals are comfortable and you can heat cycle them down to the cords and they will stay consistent - with 4/32nds my primacys are like driving on soap.

The tire is the initial means of dampening, having a square profile, stiff tread and sidewall for mileage is going to make matters worse.

The HRV has a much stiffer chasis than an older civic so the spring rates can be lower and in some instances that means the ride will be better but initial shunts like potholes will not absorb through crappy tires. Lighter rims and better tires can get the same or better levels of performance with a much better ride.
 

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Hondas specialize in road feel.
I beg to differ. In my opinion, Honda makes great transportation appliances. The Mazda3 I traded in for my HR-V had a much more controlled ride with 200,000 miles on its suspension than the HR-V did with 9 miles on its suspension. And no, it hasn't gotten better (or worse) as the suspension broke in.

But we're talking a $26,000 (back in 2007) car with multilink rear suspension versus a $20,000 car (in 2016) with a torsion beam. My chief complaint is that the ride is bouncy, but eh, it's a $20,000 econo-car. I'm not expecting a cloud-like ride.

Mazda, for a while anyway, sacrificed everything to make a driver's car. Cargo capacity, rear passenger leg room, cruising range, etc. Small cars have a finite amount of space to package everything. It's hard to fit a multilink suspension and large fuel tank and have decent rear leg room and trunk space.

Continentals are comfortable and you can heat cycle them down to the cords and they will stay consistent
They definitely are comfortable. I had Continental PureContact with EcoPlus Technology (made in Brazil) on the Mazda3.

I got Cooper CS5 UltraTouring (made in USA) installed on the HR-V. I don't drive the car hard enough to notice a difference between those and the Michelins. I'm pretty proactive about replacing tires anyway. I change them once they're 6 years old or hit 4/32 tread.
 

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Continental had some cutting edge custom designed testing and manufacturing, they have factories in Brazil for labor and tax costs but all of the engineering compounds and testing comes out of Germany, I really wish they were making sport bike tires while I was still riding, the tires on my s2000 and tsx were phenomenal same as all of the cars before them. I’m installing the terrain contact hrs on Saturday when my rims arrive and I can’t wait, so over these Michelin’s. I talked to my friend at tire rack and he said the terrain contacts are his #1 recommendation next being the coopers, the 600000 mile guarantee is awesome, at 2/32nds they give you 33% credit In a new pair.
 

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I agree, the HR-V handling is nimble and responsive but its ride is a bumpy one. Even small irregularities in the road —a man-hole cover that's an inch proud of the pavement or a very shallow pothole, 1-2 inches deep— and you feel like you're off-roading in Baja. Hit a big pothole, and it's spine-jarring. I have two cars to compare it to. A 2003 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport that I drive to work and a 2005 Ford Escape that we traded in when we leased the 2018 HR-V. Most comfortable ride, hands down, the Ford Escape. It had the most supportive seats by far and was the best over bumps and potholes. The Subaru's seats, by contrast, are too spongy and they give me lower back pain on longer rides but it takes bumps better than the HR-V does. The HR-V is the nimblest; it has the most pep; and it wins in the cargo space and gas mileage categories. I could probably live with the jostling ride if I lived in a part of the country that never sees snow and ice; but Pennsylvania has too many big potholes to deal with come winter. I'd like an HR-V with bigger wheels, tires with higher sidewalls, and a more robust suspension.
 

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First, I love my HRV but have a couple of complaints. My biggest is this vehicle doesn't seem to take bumps or potholes too well. Some have told me because the SUV is higher up it will have a bumpy ride. However, I've driven other larger SUV's and never had this issue. It feels like I'm driving an old car that needs new shocks. Does anyone else notice this or is it just me?
Hi Jim! Did you ever find a solution to this? Just bought a 2018 and thinking of buying new tires like continental
 

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2019 HRV EX CVT. 1.5 Earth Dreams. Modern Steel.
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First, I love my HRV but have a couple of complaints. My biggest is this vehicle doesn't seem to take bumps or potholes too well. Some have told me because the SUV is higher up it will have a bumpy ride. However, I've driven other larger SUV's and never had this issue. It feels like I'm driving an old car that needs new shocks. Does anyone else notice this or is it just me?
I agree. I wanted the top of the range for the sunroof, leather and safety toys. Sadly that meant accepting 17" wheels, 55 profile. I suspect the car would ride better (and more economically) on16" 60s. Its the same with all manufacturers, they need to wake up to reality.
 

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I always thought my HR-V ride was good..sure it would be better with taller tires, but I am happy with 215/55/17 tires....I once gave a friennd a ride who had a Ford Focus, and he thought the Honda rode much better on gravel roads.
 

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The HRV has a very stiff Chasis compared to other cars, even other Hondas from a few years ago. That allows them to use a softer suspension spring which improves ride quality - however the OEM tires use stiff sidewalls to keep the tread flat in corners for handling, which makes it feel stiffer than necessary. Other tires use improved tread compounds and designs to keep the grip level higher while allowing the sidewall to function more like a spring and dampen bumps.
 

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First, I love my HRV but have a couple of complaints. My biggest is this vehicle doesn't seem to take bumps or potholes too well. Some have told me because the SUV is higher up it will have a bumpy ride. However, I've driven other larger SUV's and never had this issue. It feels like I'm driving an old car that needs new shocks. Does anyone else notice this or is it just me?
Some bumps but not bad. You gave an answer to your own question as well. It’s not as big and heavy as the next segment of SUVs.
 

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...using nitrogen helps.
Unless you're in a race car, nitrogen doesn't really do anything. The 2 things nitrogen is good for is less air leakage (nitrogen molecules are bigger than oxygen molecules) and less expansion when hot. Could be someone is racing their HRV but I'd guess it's unlikely. I put 3343 miles on my previous CR-V in TWO years with plain old air in my tires and rarely lost more than a pound per month.

If my local tire shop offered to fill my tires with nitrogen for FREE, I'd do it but I wouldn't pay a single cent more to have it in my tires.
 

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You have no idea what you are talking about.
Unless you're in a race car, nitrogen doesn't really do anything. The 2 things nitrogen is good for is less air leakage (nitrogen molecules are bigger than oxygen molecules) and less expansion when hot. Could be someone is racing their HRV but I'd guess it's unlikely. I put 3343 miles on my previous CR-V in TWO years with plain old air in my tires and rarely lost more than a pound per month.

If my local tire shop offered to fill my tires with nitrogen for FREE, I'd do it but I wouldn't pay a single cent more to have it in my tires.
Wow, 3343 miles in 2 years - I put that on my HRV in about a month - 80,000 miles in 2 years so by that math I am 25x more expert then.

Nitrogen is more consistent, thats why its used - When Nissan designed the 20 inch rim package for the gtr they choose nitrogen because low tire pressure even a couple pounds at 200mph could be catastrophic, when Costco started filling all of there tires with nitrogen they did it because it reduced the free service visits and improved the customer experience.

There are secondary benefits that include ride quality improvements, and leak resistance but the main use is consistency, 2 psi between hot and cold instead of 4-6 psi between hot and cold. Plus you can typically run 2 psi more and achieve the same ride quality with better mileage.

I don't need a lesson about race cars, I've built plenty and crewed for plenty more. I've been using nitrogen in tires for 17 years now as a result and will continue to until something better comes along.

If you don't want to use it and you seem to be proud of that, but it's irrelevant to me or my recommendations.
 

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You have no idea what you are talking about.


Wow, 3343 miles in 2 years - I put that on my HRV in about a month - 80,000 miles in 2 years so by that math I am 25x more expert then.

Nitrogen is more consistent, thats why its used - When Nissan designed the 20 inch rim package for the gtr they choose nitrogen because low tire pressure even a couple pounds at 200mph could be catastrophic, when Costco started filling all of there tires with nitrogen they did it because it reduced the free service visits and improved the customer experience.

There are secondary benefits that include ride quality improvements, and leak resistance but the main use is consistency, 2 psi between hot and cold instead of 4-6 psi between hot and cold. Plus you can typically run 2 psi more and achieve the same ride quality with better mileage.

I don't need a lesson about race cars, I've built plenty and crewed for plenty more. I've been using nitrogen in tires for 17 years now as a result and will continue to until something better comes along.

If you don't want to use it and you seem to be proud of that, but it's irrelevant to me or my recommendations.
I don't even know where to start but here goes.

First, you don't know anything about my background so don't assume I don't know what I'm talking about. I could very well be a chemist with a PhD.

Second, just because you've driven more in the last 2 years than I have, doesn't mean you're "25x more expert" than I am. I would imagine I've put more miles behind a wheel than you could ever dream of driving. (Unless you've driven over 2 MILLION miles.)

Third, let's work on that Nissan GTR you mentioned. You're right about the 200 mph thing. I'm fairly certain that there aren't ANY HRVs that can get close to 200 mph unless you pushed it off a cliff. The GTR is a racing beast. Any little advantage is well worth it. The HRV (and most road going vehicles), not so much. The new Corvette doesn't come from the factory with nitrogen and it can go faster than the GTR. Debunked.

Let's move on to the Costco thing. The ONLY reason Costco/Wal Mart/etc fills their tires with nitrogen is because of the PERCEIVED benefits. People will believe anything and when someone says, "Buy your tires from ME because I'll fill them with nitrogen instead of regular air." the masses will do it. They THINK they're getting something they can use and will tell all their friends. Then, because the power of suggestion works so well, they THINK their car rides better and their tires lasted 17 miles longer and they tell all their friends to buy their tires at Costco/Wal Mart/etc.

Racer or not, I can guarantee you couldn't tell the difference in 2psi in your tires on anything short of a race car. Again, we're not talking about race cars. We're discussing road cars, specifically the Honda HRV.

Finally (and I'm super glad I'm done), you're more than welcome to use anything you want to fill YOUR tires. Fill them with mud for all I care but don't spew your baseless theories. Someone else might believe you. (If you'd like me to shoot down your other posts, feel free to PM me. I've discussed this enough, sir.)

HAGO!
 

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Circuitsports has a 1st Gen Acura TSX (as I do) and he was also on the TSXClub forum.
He wasn't so aggressive on that forum like he is on here.

This is a friendly, non-confrontational forum for a mild economy car.


Ex FormulaOne Crew Chiefs or SCORE Off-road racers don't usually post on here!
Nor do they look to Costco for racing tire technical advice!

I'm kidding Circuitsports. :) Just keep it friendly!
 

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I've had 24 different Hondas and owned a tuning shop that dealt with hundreds more and helped set up the original Honda Cup racing series and had a professional wheel to wheel racing permit by the SCCA and and and but whatever conjecture by mister opinion reigns supreme.


BTW anyone who says you can't feel 2 psi changes in tire pressure is smoking crack - 2 psi represents 1/15th - thats a 6% change in tire pressure. It’s so important that pirelli changed the minimum psi from 20 to 21 to stop catastrophic tire failures in Azerbaijan f1 event.

Also I think you missed the point, the GTR had no room for error in developing the 20 inch performance tire in 2006 - yes a corvette can theoretically go the same speed now, that doesnt mean its as stable or confident. During high speed testing and development all manufacturers use nitrogen.

But when Toyota decided to send a land cruiser 230 MPH, there was pure nitrogen in the tires, must be HiP3B0i!!!!

 

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I have a 2021 honda hrv sport that I purchased last week. Thought it road a little firm...checked the tires.. had over 38 psi in eash tire cold...lowered them to the door label...much better...so much for dealer prep.
 

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If my local tire shop offered to fill my tires with nitrogen for FREE, I'd do it but I wouldn't pay a single cent more to have it in my tires.
More and more Costco's have nitrogen filling stations outside the store. They don't require any money or membership card scanning. If I have nothing to do one day, I'll drive to Costco, jack the vehicle up, pull the valve cores, and inflate the tires with nitrogen.
 
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