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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all.

So, with winter upon us here in the North East area of Pennsylvania, I could have taken a chance with the original Michelin MXV4 because the tread on my tires was very evenly worn and the depth was border line for winter with 47k miles, or play it safe with a new set of tires. For me personally, I'm not a gambling man, so I chose to go with safety first.

After a couple months of research looking for the best all season tire to fit my requirements of best traction for all weather and the most comfortable and quiet driving/riding experience, I settled on getting the "Continental Truecontact Tour". Additionally, after considerable research, instead of getting the same original size of 215/55R17, I decided to get a larger overall diameter tire of 215/60R17 in an effort to further increase the comfort and quiet ride.

The new tires are just under 1" taller, and the tread width is approximately a quarter of an inch narrower, which is exactly what I wanted for the following reasons.
The AWD HR-V models have a half inch less of ground clearance due the the added weight of the AWD transmission, and a narrower tire is not only a quieter tire but is also better for driving through snow. Additionally, I didn't want to go extreme in size differences and run into clearance issues other in this forum have shared by going too larger in diameter/width, let alone putting potentially too much stress on the engine, transmission, torque, and brake system stresses with excessively large tires only to end up having much more costly repairs in the future.

Having said all that, I'd like to share with you my experiences thus far.
I am a bit of a musician, being a worship leader who sings and plays several instruments, which is why I installed sound deadening butyl sheets throughout the vehicle in the first week after purchasing it.
The first time driving through a rain shower quickly revealed to me how insanely NOISY LOUD the roof of this vehicle is in the rain. Just HORRIBLE! Butyl sheets will fix this noisy issue.

Using an SPL (Sound Pressure Level) Meter when I first purchased my HR-V, the noise levels inside the vehicle with the new Michelin tires averaged 76db, with a max. of 85db and a min. of 50db, and it was considerably louder when it rained, uncomfortabley louder. A detail nobody would expect during a test drive on a sunny day.
After adding the butyl sheets to the roof, doors and engine hood, the dB levels inside my HR-V dropped down to an average of 68db, a high of 81db, and a min. of 47db when the Michelin tires were new. The addition of butyl sheets on the roof no longer allows rain to noticeably increase noise ( You can hear the rain, but you can still enjoy the music and have a conversation without feeling the need to yell, SCREAM, or go insane, lol").

With my new slightly larger "Continental Truecontact Tour" tires installed, it successfully did what I had hoped for. Although it didn't lower the noise levels inside the HR-V as significantly as the butyl sheets did, it did lower the levels nonetheless. The new levels are an average of 65db, a max of 79db, and a min. of 46db with the SPL Meter secured to the dash above the radio as it was during my initial tests when I purchased my 2018 HR-V. Those of you who don't understand what SPL is, as well as the effects they have on people, it doesn't sound like much of a difference, but to those who do understand what SPL is, this is not only quite an improvement, but even more than that it's a very difficult improvement to successfully accomplish after adding the butyl noise canceling sheets, to which I credit almost entirely to "Continental" in their tire design and only partially to the larger and narrower tire I opted to get.
Additionally, and moreover, I'm thrilled with how the Continental tires perform over dry and wet roads (haven't had any noteworthy snow yet since I've installed them), and over bumps and humps. With the original Michelin tires, while performing good through all weather condition, I always thought the ride was alway quite harsh over even small bumps in the road, and especially over larger bumps which felt like I was getting bounced all over the road. Not so with the "Continental Truecontact Tour ". The ride on these Continental tires is not only quieter, but the Continental tires also absorb the bumps and humps gracefully without causing the vehicle to feel like it's getting thrown around on the road. It's a huge improvement over the Michelin tires.
Thus far, I've also done several braking tests on dry and wet roads. Although I've never measured the actual braking distances of the Michelin tires, what I've noticed differenly about the Continental tires appears to me to be a much safer experience. When applying full force to the brakes on the Continental tires, the G force feels notably higher with far less anti-lock brake involvement. Basically, better traction all the way around.
Another surprise I've experienced, to which I attribute to the larger diameter tire of the Continental tires, is the improved speed maintenance while using cruise control. With the Michelin tires at 215/55R17, the cruise control had never been very good at maintaining a set speed through road incline and decline transitions. It would always go 4-5MPH faster down even the slightest hill, and more annoyingly was how it would slow down 6-7MPH going up even small incines and then accelerate hard in order to try and catch up to where it should be. While I had thought this issue might worsen with the larger Continental tires, to my surprise, the issue no longer exists with the larger Continental tires. I don't understand why this issue with the cruise control no longer exists with the Continenta tires, but I can only theorize it has more to do with the tire size difference than anything else. Although it may also be caused by a difference in rolling resistance, possibly. Now, when I set the cruise control, it sticks to the set speed like it's glued to it, with the only exceptions occurring while going down steeper hills, which I believe is normal for any vehicle cruise control. That's what brakes are for.

Lastly, for those with concerns about the larger tires causing the speedometer to be off, don't allow this to discourage you from doing it. While I wouldn't recommend going any larger than 215/60R17 because of wheel well clearance issues, the larger 215/60R17 tires have proven to have very little deviation from the speedometer display. While observing my speedometer at 65MPH, my dashcam gps speed displays that I'm traveling 66MPH. When my speedometer reads 35MPH, the dash cam gps speed bounces back and forth between 35-36MPH. I too, after doing the math between the tire size differences, had some concerns about this, but it turns out in reality that there isn't as much of a difference as the math showed. Even if the math was correct, it would only be about 2.5MPH faster than what the speedometer displays at 65MPH (If my math was correct).

If you’re in the market and need new tires, I hope this has been helpful to you. I can honestly recommend the "Continental Truecontact Tour", and I also feel confident to suggest you go with one size larger at 215/60R17 instead of the original 215/55R17.
 

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Thanks for the comprehensive review. Sound level measurements are more logarithmic than linear.

Did you remove the headliner to install the butyl in the roof?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Did you remove the headliner to install the butyl in the roof?
Yes, I removed the headliner in order to thoroughly install the butyl sheets properly. The roof needed the most work just due to the horribly LOUD noise from simple rain. I even added a few thin second layer strips in certain areas in order to double down and reinforce noise reduction on the roof.

I also put butyl sheets in the trunk, spare tire wheel well area and the rear wheel wells. The only areas I haven't yet done are under the seats and foot wells because there's no easy way to do it, it's a bit much re involved, and it's going to be a lot more time consuming to do, and on the front wheel wells. However, this coming spring I plan on taking a look at approaching it a little different by adding butyl sheets underneath on the outside of the vehicle in those areas, instead of on the inside of the vehicle. Earlier last year I put a small test sample on the bottom of the muffler in order to determine if the butyl sheet would stay adhered under a heated condition, and it has not shown any adhesion issues or any other issues of any kind at all throughout the past year and a half.

I also had forgotten to note in my original post that I also installed butyle sheet material on top of the muffler heat shield when I first purchased my HR-V, and this piece alone reduced muffler noise to practically being non-existent. After I installed the butyl in the trunk area, I honestly don't even hear any of the droning muffler humm at all with this arrangement.
 

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I also am running the same tires, but at the OEM size. I definitely noticed a change in road noise and ride comfort.
 

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215/60R17 tire size is an interesting choice on the stock HRV 17x7.5 wheels.
I haven't seen anyone try that size tire on their HRV.

I always recommend 225/55R17 tire size on the the stock HRV wheels.
If you get a fair amount of snow in your area or if you drive in the mountains regularly in the winter, I would have recommended all-weather tires rather than all-season tires.


215/60R17 tires are 0.8" taller which will raise your HRV by 0.4", which is better in winter.
Keeping the same narrow 215 width is better in winter and in the rain.
The taller sidewall will make for poorer on pavement handling.
IMO, the narrow 215 width is too narrow for the 7.5" wheels even if the tire has a rim guard.
Every HRV I see with the base 17" tires and wheels have curb damaged wheels.

I would say that anyone wanting to use the OEM HRV 17x7.5 wheels for winter use, 215/60R17 tires would be a good size for dedicated winter tires on the OEM wheels.

For better summer performance, 225/55R17 tires would be a better choice on the OEM wheels.

As always, you are compromising performance unless you run dedicated summer wheels and tires and dedicated winter wheels and tires.
 

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Speaking of tires, I just got my tires replaced today.

I got Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06+.
 

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Typical Germans with their succint and to the point naming protocols......
 

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Speaking of tires, I just got my tires replaced today.

I got Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06+.

Wore out your previous Continentals already?

Perhaps update your tire thread with more details?! :)


 

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Wore out your previous Continentals already?

Perhaps update your tire thread with more details?! :)


Actually, I did not wear them out.

The issue was, the front right got a bubble when I hit the curb.

You're right, I should update that thread. I forgot about its existence.
 

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I had those on my Subaru. Great tire for traction, but definitely more harsh of a ride and noisier than the Truecontact tires.
I lowered the HR-V on Tanabe springs and similarly, lowered my Fit on Swift springs, so whatever “harshness” there is, is kinda given. As for the noise, I always have music playing, so it usually drowns out most things.

I value traction, pretty much above all else. Let me put it this way. For the past 11 years, I had no quibbles about driving up gravel/pebble driveways. My tires on my Fit and for a while, the HR-V, got little stones in the tread face. And it was fine… But about 1-1/2 to 2 years ago, one rear tire caught a rather large stone. Small enough that the treads caught it, but it was way too big to ever get squeezed in. I thought I would get flung off through driving… I was wrong. I could feel and hear a rather loud thump every time the tire rotated and that part with the stone hit the ground. I still put it off a bit more, until I had to turn. The moment I did that, I swore I would stop driving up gravel driveways from that point forward, That was because the HR-V would skid out each time that part hit the ground. This was too much for me.
 

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My research was limited to calling Honda and booking appointment to install four steel wheels and snow tires. I ended up with their wheels and Tiger Paw Snow and Ice 215/60R16. Gets me to the grocery store and back
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Car
 

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I had those on my Subaru. Great tire for traction, but definitely more harsh of a ride and noisier than the Truecontact tires.

The T speed rated Truecontacts are a basic low performance all-season tire.
The W speed rated DWS tires are a high performance all-season tire.


Your HRV is set up completely different than Goober's HRV.

215/60R17 tall, narrow, low performance tires on the OEM 17x7.5 wheels with the stock suspension.

versus:

235/50R17 wider, high performance tires on Enkei 17x8 wheels with lowered suspension.

Goobers HRV will be harsher, noisier, ride rougher than yours but will run circles around yours on pavement.
But I would want your HRV driving in the mountains to a ski hill on a snow covered, icy, steep road!

You can see that running dedicated performance summer tires/wheels and dedicated winter tires/wheels is the no compromise solution. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The T speed rated Truecontacts are a basic low performance all-season tire.
The W speed rated DWS tires are a high performance all-season tire.


Your HRV is set up completely different than Goober's HRV.

215/60R17 tall, narrow, low performance tires on the OEM 17x7.5 wheels with the stock suspension.

versus:

235/50R17 wider, high performance tires on Enkei 17x8 wheels with lowered suspension.

Goobers HRV will be harsher, noisier, ride rougher than yours but will run circles around yours on pavement.
But I would want your HRV driving in the mountains to a ski hill on a snow covered, icy, steep road!

You can see that running dedicated performance summer tires/wheels and dedicated winter tires/wheels is the no compromise solution. :)
The speed ratings don't define a tires performance characteristics aside from establishing what a tires general maximum speed is. That's all.

While the T rating is for a maximum tire speed rating of 118MPH, the OEM tire V rating of 149MPH, but what good will spending additional $$$ in order to get a tire with a V rated tire do when the maximum speed of the OEM HR-V cannot even go that fast, lol, or if the person driving the vehicle only drives the speed limits and will never go so high as the T rated tire? The maximum speed capability of the OEM HR-V is only about 130MPH, and that's likely only going down hill, lol.

Additionally, isn't high performance really more of a matter of perspective and/or intent?

Goober's HR-V is designed for a different kind of high performance than my HR-V. His type of high performance goal sacrifices ride quality, comfort, noise, and traction on wet and /or snow covered roads in order to gain a more rigid and responsive tire for on dry roads. When it comes to wet and/or snow covered roads, comfort and noise, I believe my intended high performance setup would be more capable of doing circles around his if we're talking only tire differences. His goals are different than mine. I definitely would have the win on comfort and noise on dry, wet, and snowy roads.

The profile of the tire, sidewall size, tire width, tread pattern, and the compound materials will really determine it's overall performance characteristics for what ever category it's designed for, but as you've described, their's always a compromise to any goal. If you get tires designed for rock climbing, they will be high performance for that activity but no so good for anything else.

We're not talking about a high performance vehicle, we're talking about an HR-V. My goal is safety and comfort, to have the best reasonable comfort, low noise, and traction possible for year round weather. I always drive the speed limit with occasional increases to pass slower traffic, and even if I went 10MPH over the maximum posted speed limit in my areas of 65MPH would put me only at 75MPH, still well below the maximum T rating of my tires. I would hope the majority of people driving an OEM HR-V wouldn't be stupid enough to push the HR-V to test its maximum speed and handling capabilities on public roads.
Others who drive like I drive wouldn't need anything that pushes the limits to an extreme.

Goobers goal for his HR-V, I would guess based on what he's done to his HR-V, are different than mine. In my opinion, he's focused more on appearance (lowered) and traction for on dry roads. His 235mm width tire certainly wouldn't be as good as my 215mm on wet or snow covered roads, even with his lower profile sidewall. His tires will be spinning off on acceleration and spinning out in turns well before my narrower tires, even if they are the same exact tire make and model. And his would have the same negative effects for emergency braking and turning when on wet or snowy roads. However, he would definitely ouperform my HR-V on dry roads given his setup, but that's really only relative in cases where someone wants to push the limits on dry roads. Something I have no interest in doing.

The bottom line is, I'm not talking about wanting tires for a lowered, modified, turbo super charged racer in order to race around recklessly on the roadways, I'm talking about a standard AWD HR-V EX for everyday driving as safe and comfortable as reasonably possible.

Each person ultimately has to educate themselves about their tire options in order to make an educated decision on which tires will meet their needs and objectives best, and there are always compromises and sacrifices involved with that decision, and unfortunately $$$ is also one of those factors.
 

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Higher speed ratings (in a given size) increase tire strength, usually the higher the rating the more robust the tire is. This robustness can translate into steering response that a driver can FEEL.

Each person ultimately has to educate themselves about their tire options in order to make an educated decision on which tires will meet their needs and objectives best,
Agree 100%!!!
 

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The speed ratings don't define a tires performance characteristics aside from establishing what a tires general maximum speed is. That's all.

While the T rating is for a maximum tire speed rating of 118MPH, the OEM tire V rating of 149MPH, but what good will spending additional $$$ in order to get a tire with a V rated tire do when the maximum speed of the OEM HR-V cannot even go that fast, lol, or if the person driving the vehicle only drives the speed limits and will never go so high as the T rated tire? The maximum speed capability of the OEM HR-V is only about 130MPH, and that's likely only going down hill, lol.

Additionally, isn't high performance really more of a matter of perspective and/or intent?

Goober's HR-V is designed for a different kind of high performance than my HR-V. His type of high performance goal sacrifices ride quality, comfort, noise, and traction on wet and /or snow covered roads in order to gain a more rigid and responsive tire for on dry roads. When it comes to wet and/or snow covered roads, comfort and noise, I believe my intended high performance setup would be more capable of doing circles around his if we're talking only tire differences. His goals are different than mine. I definitely would have the win on comfort and noise on dry, wet, and snowy roads.

The profile of the tire, sidewall size, tire width, tread pattern, and the compound materials will really determine it's overall performance characteristics for what ever category it's designed for, but as you've described, their's always a compromise to any goal. If you get tires designed for rock climbing, they will be high performance for that activity but no so good for anything else.

We're not talking about a high performance vehicle, we're talking about an HR-V. My goal is safety and comfort, to have the best reasonable comfort, low noise, and traction possible for year round weather. I always drive the speed limit with occasional increases to pass slower traffic, and even if I went 10MPH over the maximum posted speed limit in my areas of 65MPH would put me only at 75MPH, still well below the maximum T rating of my tires. I would hope the majority of people driving an OEM HR-V wouldn't be stupid enough to push the HR-V to test its maximum speed and handling capabilities on public roads.
Others who drive like I drive wouldn't need anything that pushes the limits to an extreme.

Goobers goal for his HR-V, I would guess based on what he's done to his HR-V, are different than mine. In my opinion, he's focused more on appearance (lowered) and traction for on dry roads. His 235mm width tire certainly wouldn't be as good as my 215mm on wet or snow covered roads, even with his lower profile sidewall. His tires will be spinning off on acceleration and spinning out in turns well before my narrower tires, even if they are the same exact tire make and model. And his would have the same negative effects for emergency braking and turning when on wet or snowy roads. However, he would definitely ouperform my HR-V on dry roads given his setup, but that's really only relative in cases where someone wants to push the limits on dry roads. Something I have no interest in doing.

The bottom line is, I'm not talking about wanting tires for a lowered, modified, turbo super charged racer in order to race around recklessly on the roadways, I'm talking about a standard AWD HR-V EX for everyday driving as safe and comfortable as reasonably possible.

Each person ultimately has to educate themselves about their tire options in order to make an educated decision on which tires will meet their needs and objectives best, and there are always compromises and sacrifices involved with that decision, and unfortunately $$$ is also one of those factors.

I think we are mostly agreeing. If not we'll agree to disagree!

Like all car forums, there are a range of folks on here.
Young/old, ASE mechanics, folks with limited technical skills of any kind, folks who have been hot rodding and drag racing for 30 years, folks who have never even driven a performance car of any kind, etc, etc.

Some of us, like me, can never get past the performance focus, even on a 140HP HRV! :)
 
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I don't really have anything to add... but I will clarify one thing.

I lowered my Fit because I didn't like the body roll on stock springs, as I'll start feeling ill. Let's put it this way, before my father stopped driving, he would do the whole "pulse and glide" thing... that made me nauseous.

I lowered my HR-V, so that it would be easier for my mother to get in and out of it. My Fit was too low, hard to get out, and my sister's vehicles (minivan and SUVs) were too high, being hard to get in and out. I went around to different vehicles with a measuring tape to figure out my options. The HR-V at stock was pretty good split between my Fit and my sister's vehicles, until I saw her still struggle a bit. So I lowered it. Luckily, it was enough for her after that.

It's appearance changing was a lower priority. And I wouldn't have done it, if "looks" was the only reason.
 

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I'd still recommend the terrain contact HT - coming up on 60K on them still have 7/32nds left

I'd probably get the AT now since I can drive on the beach and in really deep sand the sidewall tread could help, but I've done it a ton and had no issue.

Performance has been excellent even with the taller tire and a 1.2 inch lift - Did 125 the other day, rock solid.
 

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Hi Everyone,

I checked in looking for guidance on replacing the original tires on my '17 HR-V. I sure didn't expect such a comprehensive discussion on sound, but am very happy to know about the benefits of adding butyl sheets.

Here's my question: I have more than 60k miles on my Michelin Primacy MXV4 tires and need to replace them soon. I've read that Michelin is phasing this model out and replacing it with the Premier A/S. Has anyone tried the Premier A/S model? A tire guy at COSTCO suggested that I try the Michelin Crossclimate, which he said are "unexpectedly quiet." I'm in Connecticut, so am subject to the four seasons and whatever they bring.

Any advice/suggestions would be most welcome.
 
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