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My first long journey in my 2019 EX CVT. 1.5 litre Earth Dreams petrol/gas engine. 145 miles, a mix of twisty, hilly, rough roads, some town work in light traffic, 70 miles clear highway. I had 3, 2 hour stops. I avoided harsh acceleration unless necessary, and apart from one or two bursts up to 70mph to overtake, kept the speed down to 60mph. Result: 54.4mpg (43mpg US gallon- 4.3l/100km).
The vehicle has done 5k miles and I would expect the economy to improve further with additional mileage. The tyres are Micheline Primacy 3, 215 x 17" (as supplied new). I don't know what oil the dealer put in during the last service, but I will be using a full synthetic 0W-20 in the future, most likely Honda's own brand. Conclusion:
I would say the vehicle's fuel consumption can only be considered excellent. What is your experience?
 

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I would say the vehicle's fuel consumption can only be considered excellent. What is your experience?
Same here. The LX 6-speed manual is rated for 28/33 MPG-us city/highway (34/40 MPG-imp, 8.4/7.1 L/100km). I got 35-36 MPG-us (42-43 MPG-imp, 6.7-6.5 L/100km) on freeway cruises and 28-29 MPG-us (34 MPG-imp, 8.4-8.1 L/100km) on more routine trips.

That's with what I would call normal driving. Keeping up with traffic and not consciously hypermiling. Occasionally revving it to redline on the freeway onramps.

Probably helps that the LX 6-speed manual is the lightest configuration. I weighed mine with nothing in it except a full tank of gas and it was less than 3000lbs. I think it came out to 2950 on a scale that has 50-lb granularity.
 

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My first long journey in my 2019 EX CVT. 1.5 litre Earth Dreams petrol/gas engine. 145 miles, a mix of twisty, hilly, rough roads, some town work in light traffic, 70 miles clear highway. I had 3, 2 hour stops. I avoided harsh acceleration unless necessary, and apart from one or two bursts up to 70mph to overtake, kept the speed down to 60mph. Result: 54.4mpg (43mpg US gallon- 4.3l/100km).
The vehicle has done 5k miles and I would expect the economy to improve further with additional mileage. The tyres are Micheline Primacy 3, 215 x 17" (as supplied new). I don't know what oil the dealer put in during the last service, but I will be using a full synthetic 0W-20 in the future, most likely Honda's own brand. Conclusion:
I would say the vehicle's fuel consumption can only be considered excellent. What is your experience?
 

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While there are many variables such as wind, terrain and cargo weight, I have noticed that driving my 2019 HR-V SE in very cold temps (about 15 degrees F) for several hundred miles I get about 30 mph versus 33 mph on same trip on warmer day (50 degrees F).

Someone said maybe the engine is not able to warm up enough to operate efficiently in very cold temps. Is there a thermostat that can be changed for winter use? I might also block part of the radiator to make the engine run warmer. The car lacks an engine heat gauge on dash or in engine data plug for which I have a reader device.

Any ideas out there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While there are many variables such as wind, terrain and cargo weight, I have noticed that driving my 2019 HR-V SE in very cold temps (about 15 degrees F) for several hundred miles I get about 30 mph versus 33 mph on same trip on warmer day (50 degrees F).

Someone said maybe the engine is not able to warm up enough to operate efficiently in very cold temps. Is there a thermostat that can be changed for winter use? I might also block part of the radiator to make the engine run warmer. The car lacks an engine heat gauge on dash or in engine data plug for which I have a reader device.

Any ideas out there?
While there are many variables such as wind, terrain and cargo weight, I have noticed that driving my 2019 HR-V SE in very cold temps (about 15 degrees F) for several hundred miles I get about 30 mph versus 33 mph on same trip on warmer day (50 degrees F).

Someone said maybe the engine is not able to warm up enough to operate efficiently in very cold temps. Is there a thermostat that can be changed for winter use? I might also block part of the radiator to make the engine run warmer. The car lacks an engine heat gauge on dash or in engine data plug for which I have a reader device.

Any ideas out there?
I think the Earth Dreams engines fitted to UK vehicles (1.5 litre direct injection) have electric water pumps that only run when the engine reaches the ideal temperature. So, no thermostat is needed, but there must be a sensor somewhere on the engine to control when the pump runs. Possibly the same sensor controls the cooling fans? If the sensor failed I would hope "failsafe" would leave the pump running continuously to prevent the engine from cooking. With the pump running continuously, the engine would be running cooler than it should be with a corresponding loss of efficiency.
A couple of things you could try: After a drive of several miles leave the engine running and lift the bonnet. Are the fans running? Do you have (or can you borrow) an infrared thermometer? Check the temperature of the water coming from the engine. It should be at least 180f / 82C and up to 220 / 100 or even a little higher.
On European cars you don't get an engine temperature gauge, but there is an indicator which shows a blue thermometer if the engine is too cold and red if too hot. When you switch the ignition on you should see the little thermometer symble flash red and blue before the engine is started, verification that it is working.The blue symbol should disappear shortly after start up and not show again unless there is a problem.
In the UK you can buy an ODB plug in scanner (readout on you smartphone) for around £10 ($14 US) which will inform you of engine problems and actual running temperature.
 

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While there are many variables such as wind, terrain and cargo weight, I have noticed that driving my 2019 HR-V SE in very cold temps (about 15 degrees F) for several hundred miles I get about 30 mph versus 33 mph on same trip on warmer day (50 degrees F).

Someone said maybe the engine is not able to warm up enough to operate efficiently in very cold temps. Is there a thermostat that can be changed for winter use? I might also block part of the radiator to make the engine run warmer. The car lacks an engine heat gauge on dash or in engine data plug for which I have a reader device.

Any ideas out there?
If you want it to warm up quicker- can you run in a lower gear (more RPMs) for a bit ?
that will not do anything for mileage - but it may warm it up a wee bit sooner.
 

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While there are many variables such as wind, terrain and cargo weight, I have noticed that driving my 2019 HR-V SE in very cold temps (about 15 degrees F) for several hundred miles I get about 30 mph versus 33 mph on same trip on warmer day (50 degrees F).

Someone said maybe the engine is not able to warm up enough to operate efficiently in very cold temps. Is there a thermostat that can be changed for winter use? I might also block part of the radiator to make the engine run warmer. The car lacks an engine heat gauge on dash or in engine data plug for which I have a reader device.

Any ideas out there?

We drive our 2wd CVT all winter in Canada for skiing.

So, 15F/-9C is not cold. There should be minimal differences in fuel economy at those mild temperatures.

The major fuel economy impact in cold weather (below 0F/-18C) is the idling time to warm up the engine and interior. Also snowy/icy city roads with slow traffic will also impact fuel economy.
In theory, cold air is more dense, so more wind resistance in cold temps, but, IMO, that is minimal.
A head wind or a tail wind will impact fuel economy more than air temps.

Our HRV runs fine in cold weather. We have driven city and highway in super cold temps (below -31F/-35C).
I monitor our HRV engine temps with a Scangauge. Even in cold winter highway driving the engine temp stays over 180F and plenty of in-cabin heat.
Minimal fuel economy impact.

I recommend to monitor your HRV engine temps before you make any changes or take anyone else's advice.
The OBDII Scangauge is an excellent solution as you can also monitor voltage and CVT trans temp.


Be careful of the UK/European HRV comparisons to the North American HRV.
There are significant differences.
 
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