Honda HR-V Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm looking to move down to the States in a few months, and the big hurdle is that my Canadian 2018 HRV doesn't meet DOT standards since (apparently) it doesn't have a TPMS system, and I'd need to get one purchased and installed aftermarket.

Was wondering if any of the experts here might be able to recommend one that they've purchased, installed, and liked?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
2018 HR-V EX AWD
Joined
·
95 Posts
No need to waste money on a kit since it's most likely that the core system is already in the vehicle and just needs to be enabled.
Once that is done you only need sensors in the tires, which you can get installed from just about any reputable tire shop for under $100.
 

·
Registered
Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
Joined
·
580 Posts
You should be able to find a fairly decent TPMS system for around $50 or so. I would look for one that has the sensors fitted internally instead of on the valve, a little bit more expensive initially, but worth it in the long run.

My previous vehicle did not have a TPMS fitted as standard so I purchased the Tyrepal System which did the job. I would have preferred installing a system where the sensors were fitted internally, however, at that time I altered between Cold Weather and Summer tyres so I would either have to buy two systems or remove the internal sensors from one set of wheels and fit onto the other.

The downside to having the sensors fitted to the tyre valve was, despite using copper ease on the valves one of the sensors managed to mangle the thread and I ended up cutting the valve off - you have to remove the sensor everytime you wish to inflate the tyre, and I had the added ballache of also removing the security nut, which is what caused the threading The other involved some darling little children who thought it a good idea to try and steal one of them and in the process detached the valve.

It was more cost effective to buy a cheap Chinese knock off than it was to purchase a replacement sensor, and that was what I had on my vehicle for several years until I sold it. The good thing about the direct system is it tells you exactly what tyre/wheel is having issues. You also still need to carry out regular tyre pressure checks. In the 10 years and 110k miles I owned my previous vehicle, I got two punctures, one caused a leak and was detected by the system. The second one did not cause a leak and I was only aware of it whilst cleaning my vehicle. Fortunately both punctures were repairable.

I was initially looking at purchasing a Suzuki SX4 S Cross. This has a direct TPMS system and the sensors are internal. According to the owners forum when the sensors battery runs out you have to buy a new sensor at £80 each. If you want to run the two tyre system you have to fork out £240 for another set of sensors. So the indirect, eeny-miney-mo system operated by Honda has its advantages.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
1,847 Posts
No need to waste money on a kit since it's most likely that the core system is already in the vehicle and just needs to be enabled.
Once that is done you only need sensors in the tires, which you can get installed from just about any reputable tire shop for under $100.
It is an indirect system. No sensor in tires. It will be interesting if it can be turned on from a service menu?
 

·
Registered
2018 HR-V EX AWD
Joined
·
95 Posts
It is an indirect system. No sensor in tires. It will be interesting if it can be turned on from a service menu?
Oh I see, the HR-V uses an indirect system without sensors. In that case it probably just needs to be turned on.
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It is an indirect system. No sensor in tires. It will be interesting if it can be turned on from a service menu?
Interesting. I guess it's a bit of a toss up if whatever sensors I get are compatible with the system...?
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You should be able to find a fairly decent TPMS system for around $50 or so. I would look for one that has the sensors fitted internally instead of on the valve, a little bit more expensive initially, but worth it in the long run.

My previous vehicle did not have a TPMS fitted as standard so I purchased the Tyrepal System which did the job. I would have preferred installing a system where the sensors were fitted internally, however, at that time I altered between Cold Weather and Summer tyres so I would either have to buy two systems or remove the internal sensors from one set of wheels and fit onto the other.

The downside to having the sensors fitted to the tyre valve was, despite using copper ease on the valves one of the sensors managed to mangle the thread and I ended up cutting the valve off - you have to remove the sensor everytime you wish to inflate the tyre, and I had the added ballache of also removing the security nut, which is what caused the threading The other involved some darling little children who thought it a good idea to try and steal one of them and in the process detached the valve.

It was more cost effective to buy a cheap Chinese knock off than it was to purchase a replacement sensor, and that was what I had on my vehicle for several years until I sold it. The good thing about the direct system is it tells you exactly what tyre/wheel is having issues. You also still need to carry out regular tyre pressure checks. In the 10 years and 110k miles I owned my previous vehicle, I got two punctures, one caused a leak and was detected by the system. The second one did not cause a leak and I was only aware of it whilst cleaning my vehicle. Fortunately both punctures were repairable.

I was initially looking at purchasing a Suzuki SX4 S Cross. This has a direct TPMS system and the sensors are internal. According to the owners forum when the sensors battery runs out you have to buy a new sensor at £80 each. If you want to run the two tyre system you have to fork out £240 for another set of sensors. So the indirect, eeny-miney-mo system operated by Honda has its advantages.
Thanks for the recommendation! I'll check it out.
 

·
Registered
Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
Joined
·
580 Posts
Interesting. I guess it's a bit of a toss up if whatever sensors I get are compatible with the system...?
As the system fitted to the HR-V is an indirect TPMS, there are no dedicated tyre sensors to fit to your valves. An Indirect TPMS works with your car's Antilock Braking System's (ABS) wheel speed sensors. If a tyre's pressure is low, it will roll at a different wheel speed than the other tyres. This information is detected by your car's computer system, which triggers the dashboard indicator light. The system cannot distinguish the actual wheel/tyre that is under pressure, that is why you have to check each individual tyres pressure when the TPMS Alert is displayed. Personaly, I would continue to check all four tyres pressure even if I discover the 1st, 2nd or 3rd's pressure is low as the alert may have been triggered by more than one wheel.

There is every chance you may actually have the TPMS fitted to your vehicle. It has been a legal requirement for all new vehicles sold in the UK to have a TPMS fitted as standard since November 2014, so Honda may have just installed it across the board just in case it becomes law in other markets.

Have a look at the following videos;



(I'm just grateful his tyre pressures were not set to Turty Tree and a Turd!)

A word of caution, since fitting a TPMS to my previous vehicle and since the HR-V has a factory TPMS fitted, I used to just check my tyre pressures at the beginning of the month. However, in mid December 2020, I noticed that the ride seemed a little soft and lumpy and even though the TPMS had not triggered I suspected I had at least one puncture. When I checked the pressures on all four wheels ALL of them were under the recommended pressure. The reason the TPMS Alert had not been triggered was down to all four tyres losing pressure at roughly the same rate so none of the tyres were rotating at a different speed from the rest. I put this loss of pressure down to a sudden severe drop in air temperature, we had snow for at least a week just a few days after I had conducted my Beginning of the Month Tyre Pressure Check.
 

·
Registered
2018
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for sharing your experiences. Definitely a few things to keep in mind and dig more into!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
The Honda TPMS system is linked to the ABS system and is simpler and more reliable than the other systems with sensors inside the tire/wheel. If the light comes on due to low pressure, it will usually clear itself after driving with the correct air in the tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
And depending on what state you move to, you may not need to do anything. Colorado, for example, doesn't have a comprehensive vehicle safety inspection. They only check the VIN, and that is done usually by a police officer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
And depending on what state you move to, you may not need to do anything. Colorado, for example, doesn't have a comprehensive vehicle safety inspection. They only check the VIN, and that is done usually by a police officer.
Texas has a pretty comprehensive state inspection program but TPMS is not checked. I not sure how it WOULD be checked in a routine state inspection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I'm not aware of a required TPM system here in Pennsylvania. It could be different for other states, but I've never heard of it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
1,847 Posts
It is a law. All cars 2007 (not sure the exact year?) or newer sold in the USA must have TPMS.
 

·
Registered
Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
Joined
·
580 Posts
Even if not a legal requirement it can prove a potential lifesaver.

The aftermarket system I fitted to my previous vehicle detected a puncture that was repairable, not sure it would have been if I had continued to drive on it.

Also a few years ago it detected a loss in pressure when some kids were either trying to steal the sensor or deliberately deflating the tyre.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
People should not have to rely on TPMS to monitor their tires' conditions - psi, tread, etc. However, I do think it is a great thing to have, just in case.
A very important thing to note which I discovered while in a professional tire shop. They were in the process of replacing a flat tire and while the tire was off the wheel, they discovered "Fix-A-Flat" or some similar kind of injected slime which allowed the driver to continue driving with the damaged tire on the vehicle. The alloy wheel was contaminated beyond repair with some kind of corrosive gunk, making the wheel not usable. NEVER use this stuff! If you don't have a usable spare, call a tow truck. If the vehicle has AWD, make sure the tow truck is a "roll-back" which lifts all 4 wheels off the ground, instead of just 2. Trying to tow a vehicle with AWD with 2 wheels on the ground will destroy the drive train. It will want to engage the non-moving wheels unsuccessfully.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top