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I am leasing a 2018 HR-V and trying to decide whether to keep it when the lease is up. I like most things about it. It's got lots of cargo area. It's peppy and nimble enough for the kind of driving I do. The one thing I don't like about it is this: small bumps in the road, like a man-hole cover that sits 1" above street level or a shallow pothole 2" deep, make you feel like you're off-roading in Baja. In the HR-V you feel tossed around in your seat when driving over pretty minor road irregularities.

Our former car was a 2005 Ford Escape, which was a smooth ride over small bumps and was much better with potholes, even larger ones. It was a heavier vehicle with bigger wheels, heftier springs, and larger tires with relatively higher sidewall. So I realize it is not a fair comparison.

But what can be done, safely, to the HR-V, that would make it better able to handle small bumps and potholes? Is there a suspension upgrade kit available with that particular goal in mind? What I've found on the internet seems to be for people who want to improve the HR-V's handling at higher speeds and "spirited" driving.
 

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I think the ride is pretty great for this little car - its only $25,000.
You want smooth over bumps - go check out an AUDI or soemthing that costs 3x the price.
 

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Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
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The general consensus of opinion on my previous vehicles owners forum was that the manufacturer did not necessarily fit the best tyres tailored for the vehicle, but fitted the tyres they got the best deal on.

I initially had no complaints about the Dunlop SP01's originally fitted to that vehicle until I replaced them with Goodyear Efficient Grip Performance, which were quieter, offered better grip, and were miles ahead when it came to minor bump and road imperfection absorption. They in turn were surpassed by the Goodyear Vector 4Season Gen 2 I subsequently fitted, and as a result of their performance on that vehicle, currently have fitted to my HR-V.

I have just returned from a short break in Cumbria in the north of England which included farm tracks and poorly maintained rural roads, and the tyres handled it all with aplomb. They still get caught out with the occasional bigger pot hole, but if your current tyres are due to be replaced, I can thoroughly recommend either of the previously mentioned Goodyear tyres in your quest for better bump absorption.

Regards,

HT
 

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I think the ride is pretty great for this little car - its only $25,000.
You want smooth over bumps - go check out an AUDI or soemthing that costs 3x the price.
I think the ride is pretty great for this little car - its only $25,000.
You want smooth over bumps - go check out an AUDI or soemthing that costs 3x
I think the ride is pretty great for this little car - its only $25,000.
You want smooth over bumps - go check out an AUDI or soemthing that costs 3x the price.
I agree nice pic !
 

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I am leasing a 2018 HR-V and trying to decide whether to keep it when the lease is up. I like most things about it. It's got lots of cargo area. It's peppy and nimble enough for the kind of driving I do. The one thing I don't like about it is this: small bumps in the road, like a man-hole cover that sits 1" above street level or a shallow pothole 2" deep, make you feel like you're off-roading in Baja. In the HR-V you feel tossed around in your seat when driving over pretty minor road irregularities.

Our former car was a 2005 Ford Escape, which was a smooth ride over small bumps and was much better with potholes, even larger ones. It was a heavier vehicle with bigger wheels, heftier springs, and larger tires with relatively higher sidewall. So I realize it is not a fair comparison.

But what can be done, safely, to the HR-V, that would make it better able to handle small bumps and potholes? Is there a suspension upgrade kit available with that particular goal in mind? What I've found on the internet seems to be for people who want to improve the HR-V's handling at higher speeds and "spirited" driving.
I have a 2016 HRV EX-L and I too struggle with the pothole situation. It am not sure if I need to change out the suspension, shocks and struts, or get wider tires. I am not buying a new car so I am trying to figure out what is the best course of action.
 

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HR-V 2018 AWD / It is true that the suspension of HRVs is rigid, there is not much you can do. On the other hand, the choice of tires is indeed a good point. Switching from all-season tires to winter tires makes a difference ... the ride is a bit smoother with softer winter tires.
 

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It's way too stiffly suspended. I guess Honda was expecting construction loads in the HRV. I'm often bounced right off the seat in my road impoverished part of Canada,
 

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I am leasing a 2018 HR-V and trying to decide whether to keep it when the lease is up. I like most things about it. It's got lots of cargo area. It's peppy and nimble enough for the kind of driving I do. The one thing I don't like about it is this: small bumps in the road, like a man-hole cover that sits 1" above street level or a shallow pothole 2" deep, make you feel like you're off-roading in Baja. In the HR-V you feel tossed around in your seat when driving over pretty minor road irregularities.

Our former car was a 2005 Ford Escape, which was a smooth ride over small bumps and was much better with potholes, even larger ones. It was a heavier vehicle with bigger wheels, heftier springs, and larger tires with relatively higher sidewall. So I realize it is not a fair comparison.

But what can be done, safely, to the HR-V, that would make it better able to handle small bumps and potholes? Is there a suspension upgrade kit available with that particular goal in mind? What I've found on the internet seems to be for people who want to improve the HR-V's handling at higher speeds and "spirited" driving.
What wheels are you using. You get the best ride on 16" 60 profile tyres. From experience on my previous Honda, using a four seasons tyre such as Goodyear Vector 4 Season or Michelin Cross Climate will also help and they are excellent in light snow. My HRV is on 17" wheels and 55 profile tyres and I can understand your comment. I'll be changing to one of the above when the original tyres need changing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What wheels are you using. You get the best ride on 16" 60 profile tyres. From experience on my previous Honda, using a four seasons tyre such as Goodyear Vector 4 Season or Michelin Cross Climate will also help and they are excellent in light snow. My HRV is on 17" wheels and 55 profile tyres and I can understand your comment. I'll be changing to one of the above when the original tyres need changing.
It has the US-market standard issue 215/55R17 Michelins. I've been thinking about buying 16" wheels and using higher sidewall tires when the lease is up, if I keep the car, but the extended warranties all have language that says making any changes in tire size could result in a loss of coverage.
 

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I think the ride is pretty great for this little car - its only $25,000.
You want smooth over bumps - go check out an AUDI or soemthing that costs 3x the price.
My 2003 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport is better over bumps, which was in roughly the same price category as the Honda HR-V, mutatis mutandis. .
 

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It has the US-market standard issue 215/55R17 Michelins. I've been thinking about buying 16" wheels and using higher sidewall tires when the lease is up, if I keep the car, but the extended warranties all have language that says making any changes in tire size could result in a loss of coverage.
These are the approved tyre sizes from the HR-V's UK Owners Manual (page 609):

Regular Size 215/60R16 95H
215/55R17 94V
Compact Spare T135/90D16 102M

Wheel Size Regular 16 x 7J*2
17 x 7J*3
Compact Spare 16 x 4T

If it is the same situation as my previous vehicle, I could change over from 17 alloys to 16 steelies for the winter without it affecting either my insurance or warranty as I was using the manufacturers approved wheel and tyre sizes.

If you do decide to downsize, remember your speedo will be slightly out as it would have been configured for your 17 wheels, (on my previous vehicle it would read under by around 2 mph at 30 and around 4 mph at 70). This is where the HR-V's two Speed Alert Settings would prove beneficial.

I would also get it confirmed in a printable format (letter or email) with both Honda and your insurer that they are happy for you to downsize without it affecting anything - No Paper, No Trail!

PS apologies for the formatting, it wisnae me!
 

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I bought the HRV because the new Mazda's had a ride so harsh they hurt my aging back, my old 2012 Mazda 3 did not have this problem, and I traded it in for the HRV, which has a plushier ride than the older Mazda. I like sport rides that aren't too harsh, and the HRV pleasantly meets that need.
 

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I am leasing a 2018 HR-V and trying to decide whether to keep it when the lease is up. I like most things about it. It's got lots of cargo area. It's peppy and nimble enough for the kind of driving I do. The one thing I don't like about it is this: small bumps in the road, like a man-hole cover that sits 1" above street level or a shallow pothole 2" deep, make you feel like you're off-roading in Baja. In the HR-V you feel tossed around in your seat when driving over pretty minor road irregularities.

Our former car was a 2005 Ford Escape, which was a smooth ride over small bumps and was much better with potholes, even larger ones. It was a heavier vehicle with bigger wheels, heftier springs, and larger tires with relatively higher sidewall. So I realize it is not a fair comparison.

But what can be done, safely, to the HR-V, that would make it better able to handle small bumps and potholes? Is there a suspension upgrade kit available with that particular goal in mind? What I've found on the internet seems to be for people who want to improve the HR-V's handling at higher speeds and "spirited" driving.
Agreed, I just bought a 2019 HRV and I thought there was something wrong with the suspension because it was so rough going over any type of bump in the road. It drove like my older cars that had suspension problems and were dangerous to drive. I just can’t believe that a brand new car would drive as rough as a 1993 Jeep that needed an whole new undercarriage actually the Jeep was smoother then my HRV. I live in a pothole full city and find myself taking detours and sometimes not even wanting to drive to certain locations because I know the roads are super bad. Not at all what I expected in a brand new car and highly disappointed.
 

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My 2003 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport is better over bumps, which was in roughly the same price category as the Honda HR-V, mutatis mutandis. .
The MSRP of a 2003 Subaru Impreza starts at $17,695. According to the BLS, $17,695 in June 2003 equates to $25,514 in March 2021.

The MSRP of a 2021 Honda HR-V starts at $21,220. Or to put it another way, if the 2021 HR-V was available in June 2003, its MSRP would be just $12,272.00.

The MSRP of a 2021 Honda CR-V starts at $25,350. That price difference buys you, among other things, a multilink rear suspension and tires with taller sidewalls instead of a torsion beam or modified De-Dion rear suspension and low-profile tires. That alone will reduce the NVH (Noise/Vibration/Harshness) compared to the HR-V.

Agreed, I just bought a 2019 HRV and I thought there was something wrong with the suspension because it was so rough going over any type of bump in the road. It drove like my older cars that had suspension problems and were dangerous to drive. I just can’t believe that a brand new car would drive as rough as a 1993 Jeep that needed an whole new undercarriage actually the Jeep was smoother then my HRV. I live in a pothole full city and find myself taking detours and sometimes not even wanting to drive to certain locations because I know the roads are super bad. Not at all what I expected in a brand new car and highly disappointed.
A '93 Jeep, while leaf sprung and having solid-axles front and rear, does have the advantage of having taller/wider tires, more suspension travel, and weighing at least a thousand pounds more.

I'm not defending Honda. In fact, I sold my HR-V a while ago. But the HR-V is an entry-level, economy car. Compromises have to be made in order to meet a certain price bracket. Sure they'll put lipstick on a pig with the Sport and Touring trims, but underneath, it's an economy car with a basic suspension design.

Buying an upmarket car doesn't just get you a physically-larger car. It also gives the automaker a bit more freedom to choose materials and equipment to reduce NVH.
 

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The general consensus of opinion on my previous vehicles owners forum was that the manufacturer did not necessarily fit the best tyres tailored for the vehicle, but fitted the tyres they got the best deal on.

I initially had no complaints about the Dunlop SP01's originally fitted to that vehicle until I replaced them with Goodyear Efficient Grip Performance, which were quieter, offered better grip, and were miles ahead when it came to minor bump and road imperfection absorption. They in turn were surpassed by the Goodyear Vector 4Season Gen 2 I subsequently fitted, and as a result of their performance on that vehicle, currently have fitted to my HR-V.

I have just returned from a short break in Cumbria in the north of England which included farm tracks and poorly maintained rural roads, and the tyres handled it all with aplomb. They still get caught out with the occasional bigger pot hole, but if your current tyres are due to be replaced, I can thoroughly recommend either of the previously mentioned Goodyear tyres in your quest for better bump absorption.

Regards,

HT
I would confirm your experience with the Goodyear Vector 4 Season tyres. Fitted to my 2 wheel drive car they are better in snow than my wife's 4 wheel drive with summer tyres and quieter than the original Dunlops. If there is any fuel consumption penalty it's marginal and after 20k miles they look less than half worn out. Michelin Cross Climat's are said to be very good too.

I had wondered about tyre pressures. The book says, fully laden, 5 passengers plus luggage, 30psi in the rear tyres. The car usually has just me in it so would reducing the rear tyre pressures a little be a sensible way of softening the ride a little? Say 28 or 26psi?
 
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