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Yes, all Honda fluids are premium fluids. However, they are not full synthetic which performs better. .
I recommend Honda fluids, but I use Amsoil CVT fluid in the HR-V transmission. Honda CVT fluid is good, but Amsoil has performed better for me.

Likewise, I only use Honda Long Life Coolant in the cooling system and I change it at 30K mile intervals.

I use Amsoil ATF in my non-CVT automatic transmissions and Amsoil Manual Synchromesh in my 5-speed manual Element transmission.. Just check the labels on the back on the non-Honda fluids to see if they meet Honda spec requirements. Honda does not include their competitors' specs on their labels..

The only Honda fluid I use in the rear differential fluid of my HR-V, Element and CR-V is Honda Dual Pump II, because no one else makes it. Depending on how much I use the AWD feature in the winter going through heavy snow, I will change it at 15K or 30K mile intervals. It is thin and can break down under heat and extreme use. You can feel and hear the difference when it begins to break down.

For the engine, I use either Mobil1 full synthetic in all of my motors but I stick with the viscosity requirements for each. My HR-V runs best on Mobil1 0W-20 AFE (Advanced Fuel Economy) which is designed especially for this engine. Mobil1 even has the Honda name on the front label for this one.

Hope this helps.
Thanks I always used DW! in my Accord tranny and always used the Honda oem coolant too.. I would think the honda cvt fluid is syn. by now... Is it???
 

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Thanks I always used DW! in my Accord tranny and always used the Honda oem coolant too.. I would think the honda cvt fluid is syn. by now... Is it???
The Honda label will not tell you if it is synthetic. They are very private about their ingredients. I think it is to keep the DIY owners in the dark. When I can find a reputable manufacturer who makes fluids with specs meeting Honda standards, I check the reviews from people who have tried them. I don't just "impulse buy" these products simply because they are synthetic. So far, the only Honda brand I stay with are the coolant and the Dual Pump II rear diff fluid. If I can find a better product, I will switch. Fortunately, my local Honda dealer's maintenance shop gives me a good price on all of their fluids.
I didn't mention oil filters. After years of research, I use the NAPA Gold 7356 oil filter on all of my Honda vehicles which is made by WIX (their part no. 57356) for several reasons - microns, anti-drain back valve and reputation. The NAPA Gold brand is about half the price of the WIX brand and only the label is different.
 

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Changing your own CVT fluid in the HR-V is not that difficult. Since there are YouTube videos quoting different amounts and procedures, I decided to find out for myself how much is actually in mine and how much to add, not to mention actually doing the job.
Yesterday, I drove the front onto ramps, then raised the back end with a wood 2"x6" square of wood on my rolling floor jack. I used a level to make sure the car was level when I lowered it onto jack stands, one in front of each rear tire at the support points.
I opened the "check" hole and the level was even with the bottom of the hole which allowed just a little bit of overflow to come out. Then I closed the "check" hole temporarily.
I drained the fluid from the drain hole BEFORE opening the rubber fill plug on top of the engine. This limits the amount of air entering into the top of the transmission which keeps the old fluid from shooting past the drain pan. I poured this fluid into an empty motor oil gallon jug to see how much was in the transmission. It was exactly 4.2 quarts (4 quarts, 7 ounces).
I poured that same amount into the fill hole in the top of the transmission. Then I replaced the fill plug.
I started the engine and let it warm up completely before, WHILE HOLDING MY FOOT ON THE BRAKE PEDAL, I shifted into each gear for a minimum of 3 seconds and repeated the process twice. Then I turned off the engine and got under the car.
I opened the "check" hole and found a small amount of overflow. Perfect!
Knowing this amount is correct, in the future I will skip the engine warm up and gear shifting. I will just drain and add 4.2 quarts with the car level but I not use the "check" hole.
I will be sure to warm the engine go through each gear for 3 seconds before I drive off the ramps.
The transmission works perfectly now and this is no harder than changing my engine oil.

In case you don't know about the problems with the rubber vent cap beside the fill plug, this is a good time to pull it out and clean it. If the vent hole gets plugged, the vent cap can blow out and allow the CVT fluid to blow out of the top of the transmission. I removed the plastic air intake for access to this vent cap which takes about 15 minutes and makes the job very easy. Cleaning the vent cap takes about 5 minutes.
 

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@Boomer Guy,

Do you have a picture of the rubber vent cap beside the fill plug?

Much appreciated if you could share.

Thanks ☕
Here is a forum link with details and description. If you remove the plastic cover over the radiator and the plastic air intake (you will need to loosen but not remove two 10mm bolts at the air filter box for access) you will have a complete view and easy access to it as well as the fill plug.. Total time for removing the plastic is about 10 to 15 minutes max and it is self-explanatory. You can use a screwdriver for the plastic tabs but a proper tool is available at any auto parts store.
The vent cap is an inch or two to the left of the fill plug. Just pop it out, wipe it with a paper towel, open the air vent with a paper clip, then spray with some silicone spray to make it less adhesive to dust and grime, and pop it back in. I do this at every CVT fluid change @ 30K miles.
Make sure the fill plug is not removed when you do this, so you keep the debris out of the transmission.

 
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