Honda HR-V Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I recently purchased my first SUV, being a Vauxhall Mokka X 2019 model. I am really struggling to get used to the ride which I find very uncomfortable around town. It is really bumpy and gittery and even the smallest pothole or bump in the road sends a shudder through the cabin! I have had it inspected and suspension, tyre pressure etc is all fine.

I have only had it 3 months but I am seriously thinking of cutting my loses and selling it and buy another SUV. The Honda HRV would be one I am considering.

What is the drive like on the HRV (looking at models 2017 upwards)? My concern is that this type of bumpy ride is a character of the SUV and I may just end up with the same issue. If it's not - and the HRV is worth a good look any recommendations on models/trim? I mainly do urban town driving, no more than 5,000 miles per year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Agreed. Only a test ride will tell if an HRV is a fit for you. But if ride suspension quality is a big concern for you, it may not so much be the car type, but its suspension type. The HRV and a few other SUV style cars in this class have a Solid Rear Axel. When it comes to suspension, if the right wheel hits a bump, its like a lever and the left wheel will be affected too. This can lead to a rougher and bumpier ride. What you may want is an SUV with independent suspension on all 4 wheels. With this set up, a bump on the right wheel will not affect the left wheel or any other wheel leading to a much smoother ride. The CRV has independent suspension, so that may be a better option. Or any SUV with independent suspension really.

Also, you said you had the tire pressures inspected. I would recommend you check them yourself and adjust if necessary. Mechanics love to say that tires should be 6 psi higher to adjust for temperature changes. But in my experience, I notice a 1 PSI change for every 10 degrees F weather change, and only 1-2 PSI change from tire heat when driving. When I drove my HRV off the lot, tires were cold and it was a very bumpy ride as well, it kept drifting to the sides very easily too. I checked the tires and they had them at 38 front and rear. Manufacturer specs states 32 Front and 30 Rear. I bleed the air and now its much smoother and holds a line far better with little drift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Agreed. Only a test ride will tell if an HRV is a fit for you. But if ride suspension quality is a big concern for you, it may not so much be the car type, but its suspension type. The HRV and a few other SUV style cars in this class have a Solid Rear Axel. When it comes to suspension, if the right wheel hits a bump, its like a lever and the left wheel will be affected too. This can lead to a rougher and bumpier ride. What you may want is an SUV with independent suspension on all 4 wheels. With this set up, a bump on the right wheel will not affect the left wheel or any other wheel leading to a much smoother ride. The CRV has independent suspension, so that may be a better option. Or any SUV with independent suspension really.

Also, you said you had the tire pressures inspected. I would recommend you check them yourself and adjust if necessary. Mechanics love to say that tires should be 6 psi higher to adjust for temperature changes. But in my experience, I notice a 1 PSI change for every 10 degrees F weather change, and only 1-2 PSI change from tire heat when driving. When I drove my HRV off the lot, tires were cold and it was a very bumpy ride as well, it kept drifting to the sides very easily too. I checked the tires and they had them at 38 front and rear. Manufacturer specs states 32 Front and 30 Rear. I bleed the air and now its much smoother and holds a line far better with little drift.
Sorry, but it does not have a solid rear axle. It does has a "modified De Dion rear suspension " - the two rear wheels are connected with a large common arm that pivots off the frame of the car - it's not a true independent rear suspension - but it works for this car ( and allows for the low rear deck height and magic seats etc).
 

·
Registered
Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
Joined
·
270 Posts
Contact your nearet Honda dealerships and see if they are offering test drives at the moment. I know most are open for servicing and repairs, but under current lockdown restrictions they may not be doing test drives. I had my vehicle in for a Service and MoT early last month and the dealership were not supplying courtesy cars due to to covid, however, other dealerships were.

I find the ride and handling to be adequate for my needs. The suspension can get caught out on occasion, which sends slight shudders through the chassis, but with the state of UK roads, I'm not sure what car could cope all the time. I do not find it uncomfortable, nor jarring. When it comes to ride quality, I find tyre choice to be quite important. My vehicle came fitted with Avon or Cooper tyres, but I swapped them over to Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Gen 2 (a cold winter biased all season tyre) which has a softer compound for absorbing bumps, as well as all the snow and ice benefits. I can also highly recommend Goodyear Efficient Grip Performance which I also used on my last vehicle.

As for which spec to choose. S spec is very basic, SE contains all the essentials: safety kit, parking sensors, upgraded audio, High Beam Support, Mirror Tilt when reversing, Dual Zone Climate Control, front fog lights and leather steering wheel. Pre 2019 there was also an SE Navi which offered, ehm, satnav. EX offers leather heated seats, electric sunroof, satnav, LED headlights.

Oh, and the non-towing policy, must be a NA thing, as I have a Honda detachable tow bar fitted to my vehicle.

If your funds will allow try and purchase a 2019 MY as those vehicles were built in Japan which do not appear to have the build and reliability issues Mexican made HR-V's can suffer from. There was also an increase to the spec in SE models; reversing camera, satnav, and LED indicators- they may also have LED headlights, though don't quote me on that.

Things to be aware of; make sure you can fit in the thing. Due to the Magic Seats, which are fantastic!, the fuel tank is fitted under the front seats, so this can reduce your headroom. I initially struggled to find a comfortable seating position and still be able to see the entire dash, but I have now found a seating position that accommodates me and is comfortable. There can be battery issues. From personal experience, the Stop/Start tends to only work consistently in warm temperatures. From mid October until Mid February it was AWOl, however, since the temperature has increased over the last few weeks (global warming is not all bad news) my system tends to work more consistently. Paint is really thin, as is the metal. However, I never suffered with rust on my previous Honda Civic with the same paint and metal thickness. Some people do not get on with the digital HVAC controls, however, I do not mind them, at least you do not have to go into a sub menu within the head unit to change direction or temperature a la VAG and PSA. Again, some people do not like the audio system (SE and above), again, however, I do not have an issue with it, it is what it is; CD, bluetooth, telephony, DAB and some fancy apps. I am not a big one for tweeting, fbooking, instagramming on the go, so the system fulfills my needs. I don't have satnav on mine (Honda uses Garmin Whose graphics just looks like 'My First Satnav' to me. I have recently purchased a Tomtom with inbuilt SIM which provides voice control, real time traffic and speed camera alerts without having to connect it to my mobile. The HU runs off an earlier version of Android and is a little limite to say the least. It does declare it has MirrorLink, however, it has not been updated since Version 1, and most phones now run Version 1.2 )or 2.1) which makes it incompatible. Samsung have stopped supporting Mirrorlink in Europe since July 2020, and I suspect many others will follow, especially with Android Auto and and crApple Carplay being available on some models.

As for manual or CVT transmission, that is down to personal taste. I like the' Lee Enfield rifle bolt action' of the manual. Bare in mind the petrol (unless you go for the expensive 1.5 turbo) is naturally aspirated, with a high kick in of around 4.5k revs, basically you have to rev the nuts off it if you want to get a lick on. When joining the motorway from the slip road, I just drop it down to 3rd and go for it. It's O-62mph time is the same as my 2.0 turbo diesel Octavia - around 10.2 seconds.

I would also suggest having a REALLY good look around any potential purchase as it would appear Honda dealerships are no longer as stringent, nor diligent as they once were. I had a number of issues with my vehicle that a) should not have been there in the first bloody place, and b) had to be taken back to the dealership to be rectified: busted front passenger headrest retaining mechanism. defective 12v socket in the boot, NS hatch gas strut failing/weeping.

Hope the above helps. If you need any more info, fire away!
 

·
Registered
2019 Honda HR-V EX in white
Joined
·
38 Posts
I've had zero problems with my HR-V. The suspension is much better than my old Civic. And the roads here in Massachusetts are horrible lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
It does has a "modified De Dion rear suspension " - the two rear wheels are connected with a large common arm that pivots off the frame of the car
To add on, it's also called a torsion beam (or twist beam) suspension, not to be confused with torsion bar suspension used on older 4x4 trucks.

Never mind. AWD HR-Vs have a modified De Dion rear suspension. FWD HR-Vs have a torsion beam. I should've remembered the difference!

Subjectively, my HR-V with 9 miles on was bouncier than my Mazda3 with 190,000 miles on it. The Mazda3 has independent multilink rear suspension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Well its modified - I think the "torsion beams" would take the place of springs, so you only have dampers on the long torsion beams ( my fiends old K car had torsion beams....WOW !)

the HRV has a rear beam/ frame that holds the 2 wheel assemblies - kinda a large U shape- there are 2 pivot points on the frame so it swings up and down with the springs and seperate dampers. THe same assembly is probably used for both 2WD and AWD- its used for both to save money in production- the added rear diff is the only differnece and its NOT a solid rear axle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
NOT the same part- very similar and mount the same. 2 pivot points (RED)- and 2 rear springs (ORANGE) and seperate dampers

Top is AWD , lower pic is 2WD.

31460


31461
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Working towards our 4th year of ownership of out 2018 HRV- LX purchased in fall of 2017. On remotely serviceable roads the ride is perfect. On good roads its awesome The handling is smooth and quiet even at 75mph. Its a firm ride so potholes and rough railroad tracks are not what it likes. This car can push 40 mpg in summer and eats snow like a beast. Never had a complaint about ride quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Hi all. I recently purchased my first SUV, being a Vauxhall Mokka X 2019 model. I am really struggling to get used to the ride which I find very uncomfortable around town. It is really bumpy and gittery and even the smallest pothole or bump in the road sends a shudder through the cabin! I have had it inspected and suspension, tyre pressure etc is all fine.

I have only had it 3 months but I am seriously thinking of cutting my loses and selling it and buy another SUV. The Honda HRV would be one I am considering.

What is the drive like on the HRV (looking at models 2017 upwards)? My concern is that this type of bumpy ride is a character of the SUV and I may just end up with the same issue. If it's not - and the HRV is worth a good look any recommendations on models/trim? I mainly do urban town driving, no more than 5,000 miles per year.
Check the wheel size on the HRV. The 16" 60 profile will give a more comfortable ride than the larger, lower-profile wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Contact your nearet Honda dealerships and see if they are offering test drives at the moment. I know most are open for servicing and repairs, but under current lockdown restrictions they may not be doing test drives. I had my vehicle in for a Service and MoT early last month and the dealership were not supplying courtesy cars due to to covid, however, other dealerships were.

I find the ride and handling to be adequate for my needs. The suspension can get caught out on occasion, which sends slight shudders through the chassis, but with the state of UK roads, I'm not sure what car could cope all the time. I do not find it uncomfortable, nor jarring. When it comes to ride quality, I find tyre choice to be quite important. My vehicle came fitted with Avon or Cooper tyres, but I swapped them over to Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Gen 2 (a cold winter biased all season tyre) which has a softer compound for absorbing bumps, as well as all the snow and ice benefits. I can also highly recommend Goodyear Efficient Grip Performance which I also used on my last vehicle.

As for which spec to choose. S spec is very basic, SE contains all the essentials: safety kit, parking sensors, upgraded audio, High Beam Support, Mirror Tilt when reversing, Dual Zone Climate Control, front fog lights and leather steering wheel. Pre 2019 there was also an SE Navi which offered, ehm, satnav. EX offers leather heated seats, electric sunroof, satnav, LED headlights.

Oh, and the non-towing policy, must be a NA thing, as I have a Honda detachable tow bar fitted to my vehicle.

If your funds will allow try and purchase a 2019 MY as those vehicles were built in Japan which do not appear to have the build and reliability issues Mexican made HR-V's can suffer from. There was also an increase to the spec in SE models; reversing camera, satnav, and LED indicators- they may also have LED headlights, though don't quote me on that.

Things to be aware of; make sure you can fit in the thing. Due to the Magic Seats, which are fantastic!, the fuel tank is fitted under the front seats, so this can reduce your headroom. I initially struggled to find a comfortable seating position and still be able to see the entire dash, but I have now found a seating position that accommodates me and is comfortable. There can be battery issues. From personal experience, the Stop/Start tends to only work consistently in warm temperatures. From mid October until Mid February it was AWOl, however, since the temperature has increased over the last few weeks (global warming is not all bad news) my system tends to work more consistently. Paint is really thin, as is the metal. However, I never suffered with rust on my previous Honda Civic with the same paint and metal thickness. Some people do not get on with the digital HVAC controls, however, I do not mind them, at least you do not have to go into a sub menu within the head unit to change direction or temperature a la VAG and PSA. Again, some people do not like the audio system (SE and above), again, however, I do not have an issue with it, it is what it is; CD, bluetooth, telephony, DAB and some fancy apps. I am not a big one for tweeting, fbooking, instagramming on the go, so the system fulfills my needs. I don't have satnav on mine (Honda uses Garmin Whose graphics just looks like 'My First Satnav' to me. I have recently purchased a Tomtom with inbuilt SIM which provides voice control, real time traffic and speed camera alerts without having to connect it to my mobile. The HU runs off an earlier version of Android and is a little limite to say the least. It does declare it has MirrorLink, however, it has not been updated since Version 1, and most phones now run Version 1.2 )or 2.1) which makes it incompatible. Samsung have stopped supporting Mirrorlink in Europe since July 2020, and I suspect many others will follow, especially with Android Auto and and crApple Carplay being available on some models.

As for manual or CVT transmission, that is down to personal taste. I like the' Lee Enfield rifle bolt action' of the manual. Bare in mind the petrol (unless you go for the expensive 1.5 turbo) is naturally aspirated, with a high kick in of around 4.5k revs, basically you have to rev the nuts off it if you want to get a lick on. When joining the motorway from the slip road, I just drop it down to 3rd and go for it. It's O-62mph time is the same as my 2.0 turbo diesel Octavia - around 10.2 seconds.

I would also suggest having a REALLY good look around any potential purchase as it would appear Honda dealerships are no longer as stringent, nor diligent as they once were. I had a number of issues with my vehicle that a) should not have been there in the first bloody place, and b) had to be taken back to the dealership to be rectified: busted front passenger headrest retaining mechanism. defective 12v socket in the boot, NS hatch gas strut failing/weeping.

Hope the above helps. If you need any more info, fire away!
I have a 2019 HRV EX CVT and was interested in your comment re place of manufacture. How would I know if mine is an MY? I notice the reg. doc. shows the type as RU? Does that mean Mexico?
 

·
Registered
Brilliant Sporty Blue Honda HR-V 1.5 iVTEC SE 6 Speed Manual
Joined
·
270 Posts
I have a 2019 HRV EX CVT and was interested in your comment re place of manufacture. How would I know if mine is an MY? I notice the reg. doc. shows the type as RU? Does that mean Mexico?
At the base of the NS B pillar there is a metal tag which states the actual country (not a code or anything like that) of origin.
 

·
Registered
2019 HRV EX CVT
Joined
·
3 Posts
At the base of the NS B pillar there is a metal tag which states the actual country (not a code or anything like that) of origin.
Thanks for that. I was happy to see "made in Japan" on mine. All lights are LEDs but it is the EX model. Great fuel consumption with the CVT "gearbox" mostly rural roads, average 54mpg.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top