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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. Been reading around and finally have something to share to the community.

I always wanted to lift my HRV. My 2007 CR-V was only lifted with taller AT tires and had a blast softroading.

This time with the HRV, I also fit her with a slightly taller tires- 215/65-17 Yokohama geolandar g015. I was afraid there's going to be rubbing if I went taller. Tried it at Hungry Valley and the AWD was amazing but need more ground clearance (I did scrape a bit.) And maybe take out the front flap thingy in front of the tires.

So I googled around and found these lift springs by Tanabe. Up210 for my CVT Awd (They call it RU2 in Asia.). Lifts our HRV up to 1.5". Plus my slightly taller tires, I'm hoping to get a total of up to 2" lift. I thought about it for days and I took the bait.

Ordered it and it arrived pretty fast. Will have it installed this weekend so will update you all. I know a lot of you are also looking for ways to lift your HRV and this time rather than getting those spacers, I'm doing it the right way. The spacers will give you the lift but will also limit your wheel travel.

Here are the pictures of the springs.
 

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Although I grew up with 4x4 trucks and in 4x4 country, I'm not an off-roader, nor a 4x4 guy at all.
Our Mustang, Dodge Cummins and our Acura are all lowered. :)

I find the thought of off-roading an HRV intriguing.
If you slide underneath your HRV you will see a ton of issues that need to be addressed before you even go on a gravel road, let alone off-road or any kind of trail running.

What is your plan to adjust the front and rear suspension to correct any alignment issues?
Do any aftermarket adjustable suspension components even exist for the HRV?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The HRV of course isn't meant for difficult obstacle course. It's good for easy to medium trails. Just a step below the Subarus.

Yes, there are things to watch out for under the chassis but that's true for any vehicles you take off-roading. That's why having a higher ground clearance helps, and having good skills and responsible driving. That's part of the fun.

Alignment may or may not be needed as long as you don't lift your HRV too high. I don't intend to coz I dont want to put too much stress on the CV axles . The factory alignment bolts may be able to correct the alignment, the springs only lifts the HRV 1"-1.5".

I have not encountered anything yet as I have not installed the springs. I will let you guys know once I had them on this weekend.
 

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An alignment is always required any time you change the ride height of a vehicle.

I recommend to measure the ride height before changing the springs and again after the new springs are installed and settled. Measure at all 4 corners.

You make no mention of the shocks. Are the original shocks long enough for the new longer springs?
Who knows but if they are too short, the shocks will limit the lower (droop) travel limit which will make
for really harsh clunking over bumps and this may damage the shocks.
Who knows if the original shocks will even be able to control the new springs which are longer and likely stiffer.

After installing the new springs, a short test drive and then straight to a 4 wheel alignment shop.
I don't think camber and and castor are adjustable on the front and rear of the HRV.
If these are too far off with the new ride height, the vehicle will never drive straight or handle correctly and will wear out the tires.
This is why I asked about aftermarket adjustable suspension components.

The HRV has as aluminum engine oil pan, aluminum CVT oil pan and aluminum rear differential housing.
These and the exposed oil filter are totally vulnerable to rock damage or bottoming out damage.
A small crack in any of these in the brittle aluminum and you would have a problem.
Any kind of oil leak, big or small and you can guess the rest.
Some kind of skid plates/guards would be wise.
The fuel tank is covered by the plastic cover. The plastic cover has zero strength.
Protection for the fuel tank may also be required.

That leaves monitoring the engine temp and especially the CVT trans temp.
Who knows how hot the CVT will get under slow speed off-roading.
See the Scangauge thread for monitoring engine and CVT trans temp.
A manual trans would be superior for any kind of off-roading or any kind of performance driving but of course Honda doesn't offer a manual transaxle with AWD.


Just my thoughts, you gotta think about this stuff before you start modifying any vehicle and before you head off-road. :)
 

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has anybody successfully run and HRV for a couple seasons off road? Using the stock configuration motor? I can’t see that an HRV’s got anywhere near the power/ torque or chassis to run serious off road. It may be OK for fire roads and hard and dirt paths, but I can’t see it going up any type of hill at all, especially if that Hill is either Sandy or muddy… Does anybody have any YouTube’s of an HRV being used.? I agree with the above, I don’t see how you can Seriously offroad a stock CVT and 147 hp…
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Surely our HRV is not meant for serious off road. It's limited to easy, medium trails at most. With the right tires and sufficient ground clearance, you will be surprised how far it can go.

I have taken my first gen crv to medium trails with 225/70-15 AT tires no lift and that car has 20+ less hp and torque than our HRV. Also driven it on sand dunes on Pismo Beach, CA. Got stuck and unstuck in a shallow mud pit at San Gabriel OHV.

Just know your limit and your car's. Drive smart and have fun. ??
 

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The folks on this forum are really talking about mild off-road and dirt trails, not serious off-roading.
They been using the term "soft-roading" which I've never heard before but is descriptive.


Link to a thread that kinda got off the rails but has some off-road discussion and a youtube video in it.



Direct link to the Youtube video of an HRV going up a dirt hill. You can see the rocks being kicked up by the front tires that could easily damage the aluminum oil pans or the aluminum rear diff center section.
But this is a demo HRV that they don't care about!
The AWD HRV does poorly but it still has the stock mild Michelin tires on it and that driver is terrible.



I have zero plans to take my HRV off-road anywhere but the topic, including off-road type tires, is educational. :)
 

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Yes they call it softroading nowadays. I was rough on my crv and I sold it with 220k plus miles. Had lots of fun with it and I don't plan on doing the same with this HRV. Will take it slower and drive smarter this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Curious....does anybody know of an AWD that is good for 4 x 4 use?
The only AWD that is shown to handle rougher terrain are the subarus. But still not rock crawling stuff. Search it on YouTube and see how rough it can handle.
 

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2019 Honda HR-V LX CVT AWD. Crystal Black Perl with many many mods!
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so how did the Springs work out? did you install them how does it look? did it ruin or help the ride? is the suspension more forgiving ?? I am looking for a set of springs or entire suspension to lift the car up about an inch or two if anyone can direct me to where they purchased parts to do this??
 

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just curious - how dose softroading ruin a AWD? thanks in advance
Most FWD-based AWD systems like those found in the HR-V are not designed for extended use. They typically use a viscous torque control coupling or some other type of clutch pack on a power-take-off (PTO) to give torque to the rear when necessary. With extended off-road use, the coupling or clutch pack can get over temperature and stop delivering torque.

In fact, there's a video review of the Honda Ridgeline AWD going off-road and the instrument cluster display said something like "AWD OVER TEMP. FWD ONLY."

The exceptions that I can think of include:
  • Symmetrical/torque-vectoring AWD systems like Subaru's Symmetrical AWD or Acura's SH-AWD. These have the additional cooling capacities for extended use, since they are typically either giving a constant 60/40 or 50/50 (F/R) torque split under normal driving conditions.
  • AWD systems that allow for 100% clutch pack engagement (no slipping between front and rear driveshafts), such as the first-generation Ford Escape and some smaller Jeep vehicles. I think the Jeep Renegade and the Jeep Patriot have a "4WD Lock" function that does just that. The first-gen Ford Escape had "AUTO" and "ON" functions for the AWD system.
  • Full-time 4WD systems such as those found on the Toyota 4Runner Limited or the Lexus GX460. These have a true transfer case like a 4x4, but also have a center differential designed for a 100% duty cycle. The transfer case shifter usually has "High", "Neutral", and "Low", sometimes with an option to lock the center differential.
  • Automatic 4WD systems, such as AutoTrac, ControlTrac, or TorqueOnDemand (GM/Ford/Borg-Warner, respectively). These are not true AWD systems. Rather, it's a 4x4 with a clutch pack between the front and rear driveshafts. The drive modes are usually 2H, 4A, 4H, and 4L. 4A gives the slip necessary between the front and rear driveshafts to allow for use on dry pavement, in the rain, or on icy roads. When in 4A, the vehicle will give a minimal amount of torque to the front wheels and adjust the torque as determined by the vehicle's various monitoring systems. For example, an F-150 Lariat (the least expensive trim with ControlTrac) will give 3/97 (F/R) torque under normal driving conditions. Under heavy acceleration, it will give up to 50/50 torque and gradually taper off. When 4H or 4L is selected, the clutch locks to 100% engagement. Such a system is not as robust as a standard 4x4 system since the clutch can still slip in extreme off-road use. The Ford F-150 SVT Raptor has ControlTrac, but unlike the other trims, it has a collar that slides over the clutch assembly and mechanically connects the front and rear driveshafts together.
 
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