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Lol Honda raced a ton of Score races including winning the Baja 1000 with a factory AWD system - I have had my HRV out all day in the Johnson Valley OHV in 110 temps - Hondas Proving ground in Rosamond, CA is pretty tough both in temps and terrain as is there testing in Borrego Springs - You can kill the AWD if you try but you can kill a unibody if you try to rock crawl so use your head.

The springs are junk, all of the Chicom JDM pot metal springs are - If you want to raise the HRV start with 225 65 17 tires and 1 inch strut and shock spacers, that will give you 2.25 inches - more than that and you will have to change the rear geometry, and swab bars etc - also you will likely need to spend some time thinking about rear toe and camber. Also remember the HRV like every vehicle has a rake, the rear springs are softer but linear - if you load level you will pay for it in mileage and drag, probably traction on the front and back - also the front driver side spring is usually 1/4 longer to compensate for the weight of the driver, aftermarket springs typically dont do this and then the vehicle pulls. Only really German made springs hold there rates and length, but if you get BC coilovers they can lift the HRV and you can get swift or Eibach springs in almost any rate for them.
 

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Lol Honda raced a ton of Score races including winning the Baja 1000 with a factory AWD system - I have had my HRV out all day in the Johnson Valley OHV in 110 temps - Hondas Proving ground in Rosamond, CA is pretty tough both in temps and terrain as is there testing in Borrego Springs - You can kill the AWD if you try but you can kill a unibody if you try to rock crawl so use your head.
I should've clarified what I meant by "extended off-road use". Driving on dirt roads does not necessarily engage the AWD system to a 100% duty cycle. It's more of a problem when you spin the rear tires a lot while traversing uneven terrain. As you know, the occasional tire spin or sandy/steep hill climb won't over heat the AWD, even if the ambient temp is really hot.

Which Score vehicles are you referring to? The only one that's competed in the Baja 1000 in recent memory is the Honda Ridgeline trophy truck, which has about as much in common with a retail Honda Ridgeline as an F1 car has in common with a retail Ford Mustang.

For reference, the Honda Ridgeline trophy truck is a tube chassis, rear-wheel-drive, and uses an Albins transmission with a Pro-Am rear axle with full-floating axle shafts. It has a 3.5L engine that is derived from the J35, but that was more like a starting point than a template. The 3.5L in the Ridgeline uses a different block and is twin-turbocharged.

Honda Performance Development is down the street from me, and one of my friends is an engineer there. We occasionally race R/C cars in their parking lot, which is how I get to talk with the folks that build and maintain the race vehicles.

The 2008 Honda Ridgeline won stock mini class, if that's maybe what you're referring to. It uses the production 3.5L engine and 5-speed transmission with the production AWD system, but with "slight" alterations by Honda Performance Development for extra power and duty cycle. I'm not sure what the alterations to the transmission and AWD system are. I'll ask next time I swing by.
 

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HPD didnt perform the tuning doug and derek at Hondata did, it was to optimize the open exhaust and custom intake, other engine parts from the MDX were also used, the transmission shifts were sped up and the TQ converter settings changed to match the larger tires and nearly 100 extra hp, my friend Gary drove the production based RL for a number of years until the cheating by competitors in that class made it no longer viable and they switched divisions for gen 2 Ridgeline release. The hardware for the AWD system was stock, just ecu tuning. They did some other tuning for the RL including the CT supercharger kit but didn't release it because the knock sensor kept freaking out. Now Ktuner has it for the 09 and up models, too bad I had the 06 model still making 300hp, still ran it at several track days including Big Willow and Socal BMW's Xclass - plus a ton of hard canyon driving and some off roading at Ocotillo Wells and a few other places.
 

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HPD didnt perform the tuning doug and derek at Hondata did, it was to optimize the open exhaust and custom intake, other engine parts from the MDX were also used, the transmission shifts were sped up and the TQ converter settings changed to match the larger tires and nearly 100 extra hp, my friend Gary drove the production based RL for a number of years until the cheating by competitors in that class made it no longer viable and they switched divisions for gen 2 Ridgeline release. The hardware for the AWD system was stock, just ecu tuning. They did some other tuning for the RL including the CT supercharger kit but didn't release it because the knock sensor kept freaking out. Now Ktuner has it for the 09 and up models, too bad I had the 06 model still making 300hp, still ran it at several track days including Big Willow and Socal BMW's Xclass - plus a ton of hard canyon driving and some off roading at Ocotillo Wells and a few other places.
You are correct. I swung by HPD and was told pretty much the same; HPD had a minor role in the 2008 Ridgeline, which largely consisted of cross-checking and a lot of "ooos" and "ahhs" lol. The truck has, as you mentioned, ECU tuning on the engine and trans, but the hardware is all stock. In fact, it ran stock mini class so everything is stock except shocks, springs, wheels, tires, and necessary safety equipment (roll cage, fire suppression, battery relocation, kill switch, off-road lighting, fuel cell, radio gear).

The question I forgot to ask is, is the Ridgeline's torque control coupling used in other vehicles? I'm sure a simple part number check would answer that.
 

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If I had to guess its only the pilot shares any parts - the AWD wiki says

"Part-time all wheel drive VTM-4 used in the 2003-2008 Pilot (1st-gen) and 2009-2015 Pilot (2nd-gen) as well as the 2006-2014 Ridgeline. It is a greatly simplified version of SH-AWD Version 2, but lacks any planetary gearsets or electro-mechanical clutches, instead replacing them with single wet-plate clutch pack & a single electro-mechanical coil that actuates it. So VTM-4 cannot independently torque vector & its clutches must mechanically transfer all of the engine's torque to the rear axle. Clutch stresses and heat limits VTM-4 to a maximum operation up to 18 MPH."
 

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The springs are junk, all of the Chicom JDM pot metal springs are - If you want to raise the HRV start with 225 65 17 tires and 1 inch strut and shock spacers, that will give you 2.25 inches - more than that and you will have to change the rear geometry, and swab bars etc - also you will likely need to spend some time thinking about rear toe and camber. Also remember the HRV like every vehicle has a rake, the rear springs are softer but linear - if you load level you will pay for it in mileage and drag, probably traction on the front and back - also the front driver side spring is usually 1/4 longer to compensate for the weight of the driver, aftermarket springs typically dont do this and then the vehicle pulls. Only really German made springs hold there rates and length, but if you get BC coilovers they can lift the HRV and you can get swift or Eibach springs in almost any rate for them.
any tips on how to find these suspension parts you're mentioning? the spacers or the coilovers? all I've been able to find for the new HRV is the lift spring OP talked about.
 

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Just thought I'd share some info in case anyone ever considers buying these "lifting" springs.

So the person who started this thread has only started one thread and posted six times on this site. All six posts are in this thread. A review from a confirmed purchaser of the springs was posted on the site where the springs were purchased nine days after this thread was started. I think the reviewer and this post originator are the same.

Basically the springs didn't work out.

Here is the review: "While Black Hawk Japan service and the delivery is great, the Tanabe UP210 isn't. I was excited to find a lift spring for my Vezel and Black Hawk got it delivered pretty quick. Thank you. Tanabe UP210 springs did not deliver what its supposed to do. The springs are just as long as the stock springs, just more coils and didn't lift my Vezel the claimed 30mm-45mm. I just measured it again and NO lift at all. Same as Stock. Installation was even done by a very experienced Honda mechanic. So yes, I am disappointed, Very disappointed. Btw, the ride quality is the same as OEM. So why do you need this spring? YOU DONT!"

Here is a link: TANABE SUSTEC UP210 SPRINGS For HONDA VEZEL RU2 RU2UK
 

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I think the reviewer and this post originator are the same.
Well, they did use the same photo in this thread and in that review (the one with all four coils and the instructions).

That's a goofy review...

If the person was that upset, why give it a 5 star rating?

Additionally, the review claimed that the product was supposed to lift by 30-45mm... but on that very product page, it shows 25-35mm.

That said... I usually suspect there's more going on than what a person has claimed, especially when it doesn't work. Something they didn't do, but should've... or shouldn't have done, but did anyway.

OP mentioned not going the spacer route because that limits the amount of travel... I mean, a lift kit will do that, no matter what, unless you do what CalgaryHRV mentioned later... replace the shocks/struts with a longer one.

Anyway, I'm sure there's other bits to nitpick... but that's my thought on it.
 

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I kinda had a feeling since the OP clearly had no experience modifying vehicles or suspensions.
Good on him for ordering the springs and trying it though.
A follow up post with technical details would have been helpful.

Just like the Yellowspeed coilovers young fellow... He had a shop install the suspension and the technical questions were beyond his skill level and experience.
Not being harsh on the inexperienced folks, We were all inexperienced folks at one time.

A few more hot rodders on this forum would make it more interesting..
Rather than long threads on sunshades and CD players! :)
 
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With bigger tires you can get 1 inch of lift - with spacers you can get another inch of lift and with the right wheel and tire combo you can get another 1inch of lift. 3 inches total with spacers and 29inch tires - I do not recommend this unless you really need the clearance more than handling or MPG.

Occasionally I ding the bash bars on the drivers side awd model with just 27in tires from the stock 25 - but if I am relatively carefull and dont drive over rocks 10 inches or taller I never have an issue - I usually get out an toss those rocks to the side of the road. The 29 inch tires look cool AF but there is more of a tipping danger where I go with ruts so I chose not to post them here or recommend them.
 
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