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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any regular HR-V paddle shifters here?



If so, when do you tend to use it and is it of substantial benefit?
 

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There are definitely paddle shifters on mine (EX AWD) - haven't tried them yet. Having always driven an automatic, I'm not sure when I'd want to use them. I'd also like to hear from others!
 

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There are two situations that I can think of that paddle shifters might come in handy:
1) heavy snow: having grown up in a no-snow country I finally understood why second gear even exist on a manual (you can usually jump from 1st to 3rd), you leave it in 2nd and no risk of accelerating too much into danger
2)passing: the cvt will try and keep the RPM's low to save on gas, but if you keep it on the gear until the rev's go to "yellow" you will accelerate faster (albeit burning more fuel) its usefull to do when passing in a hurry

if you have never driven manual this two situations might not mean much to you, actually I think the paddles are nice to have but are not on my must have list
 

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If I wanted to shift I would have gotten a stick. :) I seldom use the paddles on my 09 Fit. It was a novelty when I first got it and maybe used only once for a drive. Now, I don't even noticed the paddles are there most of the times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are two situations that I can think of that paddle shifters might come in handy:
1) heavy snow: having grown up in a no-snow country I finally understood why second gear even exist on a manual (you can usually jump from 1st to 3rd), you leave it in 2nd and no risk of accelerating too much into danger
2)passing: the cvt will try and keep the RPM's low to save on gas, but if you keep it on the gear until the rev's go to "yellow" you will accelerate faster (albeit burning more fuel) its usefull to do when passing in a hurry

if you have never driven manual this two situations might not mean much to you, actually I think the paddles are nice to have but are not on my must have list
Some dealers have mentioned using them going down a steep hill, but that's about all I've heard. Honestly don't think most salespeople even know how to use them.
 

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Having always driven an automatic car, I'm puzzled as to how/when to use them. Even reading the manual, doesn't explain too much. Would rather hear from actual users........
 

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I have an EX-L and use the left paddle (downshift) regularly whenever I need a boost in power (passing a car, going up a steep onramp, etc) --- just gives the car a little extra push for the moment

Like hitting Turboboost in a videogame or something.


But, yeah, from most reviews, I don't think any reviewers have heard of paddle shifters or steering wheel radio controls...
 

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Having always driven an automatic car, I'm puzzled as to how/when to use them. Even reading the manual, doesn't explain too much. Would rather hear from actual users........
I use the paddle shifters often, especially when I need that extra oomph. Very responsive and a lots of fun. There is a thread on paddle shifters:

http://www.hrvforum.com/forum/289-h...41-paddle-shifters-unappreciated-feature.html

Just have to practice on using them, in a safe environment such as alone on the road, to get the hang of using them. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!!

I probably would NOT have bought the HR-V if it did not have them.
 

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Any regular HR-V paddle shifters here?

If so, when do you tend to use it and is it of substantial benefit?
Paddles are very handy on mountain roads. In D, approaching a curve, a tap on the left paddle does a 7 > 4 downshift, and with moderate throttle the transmission stays in that gear while exiting the curve. Paddle upshifts are sloppy in D, much crisper in S. Interestingly, at highway speeds, a tap on the right paddle downshifts from an undocumented overdrive to 7, which raises the RPMs about 500 rpm.

With a Fit, I used S mode and the paddles all the time on the highway, but the HR-V CVT is so much better than the Fit's AT that I rarely need S mode, except during "spirited" mountain driving over very tight roads, where I want to keep the engine in a 5000-6000 rpm range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Paddles are very handy on mountain roads. In D, approaching a curve, a tap on the left paddle does a 7 > 4 downshift, and with moderate throttle the transmission stays in that gear while exiting the curve. Paddle upshifts are sloppy in D, much crisper in S. Interestingly, at highway speeds, a tap on the right paddle downshifts from an undocumented overdrive to 7, which raises the RPMs about 500 rpm.

With a Fit, I used S mode and the paddles all the time on the highway, but the HR-V CVT is so much better than the Fit's AT that I rarely need S mode, except during "spirited" mountain driving over very tight roads, where I want to keep the engine in a 5000-6000 rpm range.
Interesting! Thanks.
 

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I usually shift into sport, then click the paddles. If you do it at a dead stop it will redline every gear when you pull off. I noticed when i leave mine in drive it wants to do a fake shift at 4/5 rpm. I do it when I need to squeeze every last drop of power out for merging or over taking. But once you hit 110/115 mph no matter what you do there is no power left.
 

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I've always been driving a manual and HRV is actually the first automatic car I bought.
I use the paddle shift all the time and mostly is when slowing down the car just like how I would down shift on my manual transmission cars before. however, in the HRV usually I need to downshift twice at first to get the result I wanted. The CVT shifts too fast and too early in my opinion that's why I always need to down shift twice because it was never at the right range which I desire.

I know there's always a debate between downshift and using the brake and I understand brake is cheaper to replace but this is just a personal preference so please do not need to criticize.
 

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I use the paddle shift all the time and mostly is when slowing down the car just like how I would down shift on my manual transmission cars before. however, in the HRV usually I need to downshift twice at first to get the result I wanted. The CVT shifts too fast and too early in my opinion that's why I always need to down shift twice because it was never at the right range which I desire.
Are you in D or S? If in Sport mode, each tap of the paddle downshifts 1 "gear," but if in Drive mode, then depending on how fast you are going, it may downshift to 5 or 4, which I find to be "just right" while setting up for a curve on a mountain road. Even better, it stays in that gear when you accelerate through the curve, and doesn't upshift until you get off the gas.
 

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Are you in D or S? If in Sport mode, each tap of the paddle downshifts 1 "gear," but if in Drive mode, then depending on how fast you are going, it may downshift to 5 or 4, which I find to be "just right" while setting up for a curve on a mountain road. Even better, it stays in that gear when you accelerate through the curve, and doesn't upshift until you get off the gas.
I'm mostly in D mode cause I drive city and highway most of the time so I can't speak for the experience of mountain rides. If you are in S mode then shifting the paddles will keep you in Manual mode. But still most of the time I shift to slow down the car, as oppose to your mountain driving, most of the time you shift to accelerate!
 

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I'm mostly in D mode cause I drive city and highway most of the time so I can't speak for the experience of mountain rides. If you are in S mode then shifting the paddles will keep you in Manual mode. But still most of the time I shift to slow down the car, as oppose to your mountain driving, most of the time you shift to accelerate!
No, it's exactly the opposite. I really don't like the sloppy way it upshifts in D with the right paddle, so I only use the left to decelerate, and let it handle the upshift when it thinks appropriate. S mode is a different matter.
 

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Another good reason to have paddle shifters is for down hills/mountains where you don't want to overheat your brakes. For instance, here in Colorado, you can drive up to the peak of Pikes Peak which is over 14,000 ft up. On the drive down, they have a checkpoint halfway where they check the temperature of your brakes. Over a certain amount, they make you pull over and wait a while for your brakes to cool down. My using the transmission to slow yourself instead of the brakes, your brakes stay nice and cool.
 

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On my last test drive (about a week or two ago), I had two other people in an EX-L AWD HR-V and made extensive use of the paddles. Simply put, they do help in the pep department over keeping the transmission in "D," especially if one keeps the engine between the published torque and HP peaks (e.g., 4300RPM and 6500RPM, respectively). The downside, of course, is increased fuel consumption.

I do have one question for those of you that own an EX-L AWD and use the paddles regularly: does taking off in first gear and shifting to second at 15mph or so help the car get moving quicker from a stop? Surprisingly, I never bothered to try that when testing the car. I did notice that the CVT really got bogged down when flooring the accelerator from a dead stop - oddly enough, it was not much faster than if half throttle was used, just much louder. My Golf also has paddles, and I've noticed that unless flooring the accelerator, the take-off is much slower/delayed in D mode vs. manually keeping the car in first gear, as the transmission will immediately shift into second and third gears under normal use.
 
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