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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I replaced the spark plugs on my 2016 HRV with just over 73K miles.

I know this is prior to the 100K recommended mileage interval so you don’t have to comment that I did it too early, it is my choice, my time, my car (and see photo of what I paid for the plugs who really cares at that price).

Here are some pointers on the process:

Remove harness cover with flat head screwdriver and ¼ turn counter-clockwise for each fastener then set the cover aside (see photo).

I used compressed air to blow off the top of the coils to help prevent any debris from falling in to the spark plugs wells before starting the disassembly.

The coil connector electrical couplers pull straight off when you depress the release tab (see photo).

Remove each of the coil retaining bolts 10mm hex bolt (9 ft/lb torque).

I numbered each coil and set them aside (Unnecessary but I figured I’d keep them the same going back on). Due to the wire size it is impossible to mess up the firing order so don’t stress about this at all.

I did one plug at a time this takes a 5/8th spark plug socket and a 4” extension – I used a magnetic socket which I’d recommend to hold the plugs as they are removed from the spark plug well.

The Honda service manual says to use a small amount of anti-seize when installing the plugs, finger tighten, then torque to 16 ft /lbs. I used NGK - DILZKR7B11GS Laser Iridium Plugs (see photo)

NGK has a service bulletin saying do not using anti-seize. I called NGK tech support and they verified to not use anti-seize at all on the Laser Iridium Plugs so I did not (they said only use anti-seize if you are re-installing old plugs and pay careful attention to torque by reducing by 30% due to the lubricant properties of the anti-seize compound). The dry 16 ft/lb torque was pretty much a ¼ turn (just a hair under). Also I noted that the original plugs showed no sign of any anti-seize on their threads.

I added a small amount of dielectric grease to each plug well around the coil boot opening (Honda tech docs did not call for it but I typically exceed what is required – see photo).

Push each coil onto the new plugs. Torque the retaining bolt then push the coil connector electrical couplers on to the ignition coil until it clicks securely in to place.

Slip the harness cover back on – see photo for tab position, then turn the fasteners ¼ turn to lock (they will click)…your done.

Another very simple and quick job anyone can do themselves and save a bunch of cash compared to if you had to pay the dealer to do it.
 

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Thank you for the pointers. I agree it is your choice regarding timing. However, we learn from each other on this forum. If there is a reason other than pure choice (e.g. a problem or performance), I appreciate if you could share.
 

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AFAIK Honda uses the regular NGK Iridium plugs across all their cars. Any reason you sprung for the fancy Laser Iridium ones rather than stick with the OEM? Seems like it's overkill for this engine...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the pointers. I agree it is your choice regarding timing. However, we learn from each other on this forum. If there is a reason other than pure choice (e.g. a problem or performance), I appreciate if you could share.
My philosophy is simply to keep all my consumable maintenance items replaced prior to suggested intervals. Additionally I had a coupon expiring for Advanced Auto and got the plugs crazy cheap, so why not do the job on a holiday with some extra day off…. So… no mechanical issue just staying ahead of the curve and sharing the info with anyone who can benefit. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
AFAIK Honda uses the regular NGK Iridium plugs across all their cars. Any reason you sprung for the fancy Laser Iridium ones rather than stick with the OEM? Seems like it's overkill for this engine...
@Pingpog...my HRV had identical OEM plugs pulled out...same exact part number. The owners manual page 71 (see attached) has the same plugs specified.
 

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I replaced the spark plugs on my 2016 HRV with just over 73K miles.

I know this is prior to the 100K recommended mileage interval so you don’t have to comment that I did it too early, it is my choice, my time, my car (and see photo of what I paid for the plugs who really cares at that price).

Here are some pointers on the process:

Remove harness cover with flat head screwdriver and ¼ turn counter-clockwise for each fastener then set the cover aside (see photo).

I used compressed air to blow off the top of the coils to help prevent any debris from falling in to the spark plugs wells before starting the disassembly.

The coil connector electrical couplers pull straight off when you depress the release tab (see photo).

Remove each of the coil retaining bolts 10mm hex bolt (9 ft/lb torque).

I numbered each coil and set them aside (Unnecessary but I figured I’d keep them the same going back on). Due to the wire size it is impossible to mess up the firing order so don’t stress about this at all.

I did one plug at a time this takes a 5/8th spark plug socket and a 4” extension – I used a magnetic socket which I’d recommend to hold the plugs as they are removed from the spark plug well.

The Honda service manual says to use a small amount of anti-seize when installing the plugs, finger tighten, then torque to 16 ft /lbs. I used NGK - DILZKR7B11GS Laser Iridium Plugs (see photo)

NGK has a service bulletin saying do not using anti-seize. I called NGK tech support and they verified to not use anti-seize at all on the Laser Iridium Plugs so I did not (they said only use anti-seize if you are re-installing old plugs and pay careful attention to torque by reducing by 30% due to the lubricant properties of the anti-seize compound). The dry 16 ft/lb torque was pretty much a ¼ turn (just a hair under). Also I noted that the original plugs showed no sign of any anti-seize on their threads.

I added a small amount of dielectric grease to each plug well around the coil boot opening (Honda tech docs did not call for it but I typically exceed what is required – see photo).

Push each coil onto the new plugs. Torque the retaining bolt then push the coil connector electrical couplers on to the ignition coil until it clicks securely in to place.

Slip the harness cover back on – see photo for tab position, then turn the fasteners ¼ turn to lock (they will click)…your done.

Another very simple and quick job anyone can do themselves and save a bunch of cash compared to if you had to pay the dealer to do it.
Thank you for the comprehensive writeup and photos. I will be doing a plug change on my 2016 soon even though it only has about 33,000 miles on it. For the price of 4 plugs and an hour of my time, it is worth it. I waited until 90,000 miles on my 2005 Pilot and it was a bit of a struggle getting the coil bolts and plugs out. Should have done it much sooner especially since one of the plugs was not tightened.

Just one question about your post: What software did you use to do the very professional looking annotations on those photos?
 

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I usually change my own spark plugs but since the valves should be adjusted in the 110K-120K mile range, I have my Honda service department lead mechanic do it. Yes, it is expensive but he has been a trusted friend for over 30 years and I won't let anyone else do it. He says the valve adjustment is critical on Honda engines because the valves tighten with age instead of loosen and this can lead to serious problems. He's been the only mechanic I've trusted to work on all of my Honda engines since the early 1990's.
 
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