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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I own a 2021 HR-V EX AWD and found this in my rear passenger tire yesterday after the low tire pressure light came on. I plan on plugging it myself, even though it's not recommended. I'm wondering if I need to replace all tires since it's an AWD vehicle or can I just replace one or both in rear?
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The bigger issue with changing only one as I understand it is that if the sizes are different it can put stress on the mechanical aspects of the drive on that portion of the car.
That's what I had heard/read in the past. I've also heard that if you have an AWD vehicle, you have to change all tires at the same time. I'm not sure if that's feasible though, especially being the cost of one Michelin tire is over $200!
 

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Plug it! If it doesn't leak you should be good to go. If pressure leaks off over a period of time, turning on the TPS light, take it to a tire shop and have them patch it on the inside.

There is no mention anywhere, that I've seen, of replacing all the tires at the same time, as is required on a Subaru. They each use a different AWD system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Plug it! If it doesn't leak you should be good to go. If pressure leaks off over a period of time, turning on the TPS light, take it to a tire shop and have them patch it on the inside.

There is no mention anywhere, that I've seen, of replacing all the tires at the same time, as is required on a Subaru. They each use a different AWD system.
I plugged it last night and will keep an eye on it through the next few weeks. I think I saw a Scotty Kilmer video where he bashed AWD vehicles as a waste of money and mentioned that when one tire goes, they all need to be replaced. He may have been just referencing the Subaru, but I can't remember.
 

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I plugged it last night and will keep an eye on it through the next few weeks. I think I saw a Scotty Kilmer video where he bashed AWD vehicles as a waste of money and mentioned that when one tire goes, they all need to be replaced. He may have been just referencing the Subaru, but I can't remember.
I could not imagine HONDA building a vehicle that would need to replace all 4 tires if only 1 got a flat - kinda goes against their creedo.
 

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I could not imagine HONDA building a vehicle that would need to replace all 4 tires if only 1 got a flat - kinda goes against their creedo.
It's not a Honda thing, but physics. Tires need to be the same diameter. A 2WD vehicle can be off by a bit before causing potential issues, but as long as the front 2 and back 2 are close it's OK. Though this makes rotation in the recommended modified X impossible. 4WD vehicles can be damaged if they aren't matched closely.
Repair if possible, as the tire wear will be identical to the remaining 3 tires.


"As published in their vehicle owner's manual, "rolling radius of all 4 tires must remain the same" or within 4/32-inch of each other in remaining tread depth.
While the cost of our street tire shaving service will range from $25 to $35 for each tire, it is significantly less than the cost of unnecessarily replacing the remaining two or three good tires with lots of mileage still available from them."

Wow, never heard of that, but makes cents (sense) !
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It's not a Honda thing, but physics. Tires need to be the same diameter. A 2WD vehicle can be off by a bit before causing potential issues, but as long as the front 2 and back 2 are close it's OK. Though this makes rotation in the recommended modified X impossible. 4WD vehicles can be damaged if they aren't matched closely.
Repair if possible, as the tire wear will be identical to the remaining 3 tires.


"As published in their vehicle owner's manual, "rolling radius of all 4 tires must remain the same" or within 4/32-inch of each other in remaining tread depth.
While the cost of our street tire shaving service will range from $25 to $35 for each tire, it is significantly less than the cost of unnecessarily replacing the remaining two or three good tires with lots of mileage still available from them."

Wow, never heard of that, but makes cents (sense) !
.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I also found this in the owners manual:
Tire and Wheel Replacement Replace your tires with radials of the same size, load range, speed rating, and maximum cold tire pressure rating (as shown on the tire’s sidewall). Using tires of a different size or construction can cause certain vehicle systems such as the ABS and Vehicle Stability Assist® (VSA®) system to work incorrectly. It is best to replace all four tires at the same time. If that isn’t possible, replace the front or rear tires in pairs. Make sure that the wheel’s specifications match those of the original wheels.
 

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It's not a Honda thing, but physics. Tires need to be the same diameter. A 2WD vehicle can be off by a bit before causing potential issues, but as long as the front 2 and back 2 are close it's OK. Though this makes rotation in the recommended modified X impossible. 4WD vehicles can be damaged if they aren't matched closely.
Repair if possible, as the tire wear will be identical to the remaining 3 tires.


"As published in their vehicle owner's manual, "rolling radius of all 4 tires must remain the same" or within 4/32-inch of each other in remaining tread depth.
While the cost of our street tire shaving service will range from $25 to $35 for each tire, it is significantly less than the cost of unnecessarily replacing the remaining two or three good tires with lots of mileage still available from them."

Wow, never heard of that, but makes cents (sense) !
But it is a Honda thing. What you quoted from the TireRack article is from an Audi owners manual, which uses an AWD system very different from Honda's. Since the Honda system only powers the rear wheels for a limited time and shifts to 2WD when cruising, tire matching isn't that critical. If it was, it would be mentioned in the owners manual as it is in other brands. While TireRack is in business to sell tires, there is no mention of Honda vehicles in this article.

Even so, since most tires only have 8/32 to 9/32" usable tread before hitting the wear indicators, a tire that is 50% worn would still meet Audi's 4/32 difference to a new tire specification.

See how Honda's unique AWD system works...
Honda Real Time AWD


See how
 

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Throw your spare on there and see what it does..

I had a 2009 Mitsubishi that got a flat..within a few minutes after putting on the spare, I was getting a light show on the dash about the AWD system...
 

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It's not a Honda thing, but physics. Tires need to be the same diameter. A 2WD vehicle can be off by a bit before causing potential issues, but as long as the front 2 and back 2 are close it's OK. Though this makes rotation in the recommended modified X impossible. 4WD vehicles can be damaged if they aren't matched closely.
Repair if possible, as the tire wear will be identical to the remaining 3 tires.


"As published in their vehicle owner's manual, "rolling radius of all 4 tires must remain the same" or within 4/32-inch of each other in remaining tread depth.
While the cost of our street tire shaving service will range from $25 to $35 for each tire, it is significantly less than the cost of unnecessarily replacing the remaining two or three good tires with lots of mileage still available from them."

Wow, never heard of that, but makes cents (sense) !
it s why Honda doesn't put 4 unique tires on their vehicles- cost of ownership/maintenance is paramount.
( my friend's Nissan Pathfinder had 4 directional tires- and the rears were larger than the fronts (16" and 17") - had specific mounted tires on each corner- nightmare )
 

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Throw your spare on there and see what it does..

I had a 2009 Mitsubishi that got a flat..within a few minutes after putting on the spare, I was getting a light show on the dash about the AWD system...
I used the spare- only had TPS warning light- drove 35 miles home then 6 miles to shop to repair. No AWD light came on.
( my gut says the AWD never even activated during that time period TBH )
 

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I take this as a recommendation("it's best"), not a requirement. They are actually saying here that you can mix worn rear tires with new fronts. When they talk about "SIZE" here, they are talking about the actual size of the tire ie: 215/55/R17, not the diameter.

Of course we can all do what we feel is best. If I'd blow a tire and the other 3 have a ton of miles left on them, I'd probably only replace the blown tire. That's just me. Yeah, it might not play well with the TPS, or maybe it will. If the difference in new vs old is minimum, I doubt that there would be an issue. Best case scenario would to find a used tire of the same size/brand as a replacement. The tire shop up the road from me keeps some good used take-offs just for this reason.
 

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But it is a Honda thing. What you quoted from the TireRack article is from an Audi owners manual, which uses an AWD system very different from Honda's. Since the Honda system only powers the rear wheels for a limited time and shifts to 2WD when cruising, tire matching isn't that critical. If it was, it would be mentioned in the owners manual as it is in other brands. While TireRack is in business to sell tires, there is no mention of Honda vehicles in this article.

Even so, since most tires only have 8/32 to 9/32" usable tread before hitting the wear indicators, a tire that is 50% worn would still meet Audi's 4/32 difference to a new tire specification.

See how Honda's unique AWD system works...
Honda Real Time AWD


See how
If there was an accident and someone was hurt. I would sleep well knowing I spent the $25 to do what was best and make sure they were matched.
My rule is tires and brakes are never something to skimp on, but to each their own.
 

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I take this as a recommendation("it's best"), not a requirement. They are actually saying here that you can mix worn rear tires with new fronts. When they talk about "SIZE" here, they are talking about the actual size of the tire ie: 215/55/R17, not the diameter.
There is enough lawyer talks there to protect themselves.

It really depends on how old you tires are. I just had a flat that is unrepairable. My tires have almost 60K miles on them. I had all 4 replaced. Replacing one tire is not an issue, if you do it right. there are tire shops that can shave your new tire to match the depth of your other 3.


Here is someone that had an issue replacing just one tire. YMMV.

 
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