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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a 2019 HR-V, with a wheel and tire replacement package. This package covers the full cost of a damaged tire for virtually any reason.
Low and behold I needed a tire replaced, it was on backorder at the Honda Dealer so I ventured elsewhere. *(I believe the dealer intended to only replace the one passenger rear tire anyways.
So I found the matching tire (Michelin Primacy Vx4 I believe) have it put on and now my Tire Pressure sensor has been on ever since *(About 1k miles or so, and i'm noticing more pull to the left which is opposite side to where the new tire is on the passenger side.
So my question is, how bad is it to drive like this, with one new tire and three others at about 7-8/16 depth?
Will this tire pressure light stay on forever, it has been reset multiple times, no tires are low on air at all.
Should I replace them all, how can I work around this issue, it is driving me nuts! Please help.
 

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Made me question how Honda made the choice for the indirect measurement system.
The Suzuki SX4 S-Cross is a direct competitor to the HR-V in the UK, and it uses a Direct TPMS system. It costs around £85 for a new sensor. If you operate a winter/summer tyre rotation and want to prevent a permanent tpms alert, you either have to remove each sensor from one set of tyres to the other, or buy 4 new ones at over £320.

Not sure about the Suzuki system, but with some systems you cannot replaced the sensor battery, and have to purchase a new sensor when the battery dies.

To the OP, the indirect TPMS system works on each wheels rotation and from information sent by the ABS. Unlike a direct sensor system it cannot detect pressure loss, only that one or more wheels is rotating at a different speed o the other wheels.

Like the rest of the world I use the metric system, so cannot tell how much of a difference there is in the tread depth between your new and old tyre. New tyres normally have around 8mm of tread, so if your other tyres are at around 5 or 6mm, the indirect system may have detected that difference and think your old tyre on the same axle as your new tyre is losing pressure. The fact your vehicle is pulling to the side of the old tyre may mean you'll have to replace it, or at least have the tracking checked.
 

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The Suzuki SX4 S-Cross is a direct competitor to the HR-V in the UK, and it uses a Direct TPMS system. It costs around £85 for a new sensor. If you operate a winter/summer tyre rotation and want to prevent a permanent tpms alert, you either have to remove each sensor from one set of tyres to the other, or buy 4 new ones at over £320.

Not sure about the Suzuki system, but with some systems you cannot replaced the sensor battery, and have to purchase a new sensor when the battery dies.

To the OP, the indirect TPMS system works on each wheels rotation and from information sent by the ABS. Unlike a direct sensor system it cannot detect pressure loss, only that one or more wheels is rotating at a different speed o the other wheels.

Like the rest of the world I use the metric system, so cannot tell how much of a difference there is in the tread depth between your new and old tyre. New tyres normally have around 8mm of tread, so if your other tyres are at around 5 or 6mm, the indirect system may have detected that difference and think your old tyre on the same axle as your new tyre is losing pressure. The fact your vehicle is pulling to the side of the old tyre may mean you'll have to replace it, or at least have the tracking checked.
honesty - if they didn't need to provide this by law- they shouldn't have, or make it an option for the direct reading ones - and have a display option to view the actual TP etc.
the indirect system has given me a few false alerts too many times that i don't trust it actually alerting me when it should.
 

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I purchased a 2019 HR-V, with a wheel and tire replacement package. This package covers the full cost of a damaged tire for virtually any reason.
Low and behold I needed a tire replaced, it was on backorder at the Honda Dealer so I ventured elsewhere. *(I believe the dealer intended to only replace the one passenger rear tire anyways.
So I found the matching tire (Michelin Primacy Vx4 I believe) have it put on and now my Tire Pressure sensor has been on ever since *(About 1k miles or so, and i'm noticing more pull to the left which is opposite side to where the new tire is on the passenger side.
So my question is, how bad is it to drive like this, with one new tire and three others at about 7-8/16 depth?
Will this tire pressure light stay on forever, it has been reset multiple times, no tires are low on air at all.
Should I replace them all, how can I work around this issue, it is driving me nuts! Please help.

Why was the tire replaced?
Is the ABS light on also?

Remove the tire and check the ABS sensor and related wiring.

You mean 7-8/32nd of an inch tread depth right!!??
The new tire tread depth is likely 10/32nd of an inch.
That's a fair bit of tire wear so replacing the pair of tires would be recommended.
The difference in tire diameter could be the issue could be why the TPMS alert is triggering.

With some AWD vehicles, all 4 tires should be replaced at the same time, but not necessary with the basic AWD system that the 1st gen HRV has.


TPMS systems are totally lame but necessary for non-technical folks.
Mandatory in Canada since about 2008 or so.
There are several ways to disable a traditional TMPS system but I don't think there is a simple way to disable the HRV TPMS system.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why was the tire replaced?
Is the ABS light on also?

Remove the tire and check the ABS sensor and related wiring.

You mean 7-8/32nd of an inch tread depth right!!??
The new tire tread depth is likely 10/32nd of an inch.
That's a fair bit of tire wear so replacing the pair of tires would be recommended.
The difference in tire diameter could be the issue could be why the TPMS alert is triggering.

With some AWD vehicles, all 4 tires should be replaced at the same time, but not necessary with the basic AWD system that the 1st gen HRV has.


TPMS systems are totally lame but necessary for non-technical folks.
Mandatory in Canada since about 2008 or so.
There are several ways to disable a traditional TMPS system but I don't think there is a simple way to disable the HRV TPMS system.
Tire was leaking air slowly and had been repaired twice before they told me.

so I should also replace the other rear driver side tire?

wont the sensor still go off? Seems so stupid to me, I’m just supposed to drive it with this light going off from now on?
 

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Tire was leaking air slowly and had been repaired twice before they told me.

so I should also replace the other rear driver side tire?

wont the sensor still go off? Seems so stupid to me, I’m just supposed to drive it with this light going off from now on?
I think when i got a replacement 2nd tire- i had them put both " newer " tires on the front wheels
- and after re-calibration, the system stopped with false warnings.
so i had 2 original tires- then newer tire, and a brand new tire on my 2017.

I thought it was a clever system- but it turns out i hated it too.
 

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I could go into great detail and give my opinion as to why I think Honda didn't install a direct tpms system to the MkII HR-V, but in all probability it would be deleted for going off topic.

What I will say is you can buy aftermarket direct tpms systems. I installed one on my previous vehicle for around £120. A few years later I replaced this with a more sophisticated and smaller Chinese knock off system for around £30, which was still going strong right up til I sold the vehicle.

A word of caution, direct tpms are not infallible either, they rely on there being a loss of pressure. I had a nail deeply embedded into the tread of a tyre, however, as there was no leak, and no loss in pressure, the tpms did not detect it. I saw it whilst doing my weekly pressure tests.
 

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I could go into great detail and give my opinion as to why I think Honda didn't install a direct tpms system to the MkII HR-V, but in all probability it would be deleted for going off topic.

What I will say is you can buy aftermarket direct tpms systems. I installed one on my previous vehicle for around £120. A few years later I replaced this with a more sophisticated and smaller Chinese knock off system for around £30, which was still going strong right up til I sold the vehicle.

A word of caution, direct tpms are not infallible either, they rely on there being a loss of pressure. I had a nail deeply embedded into the tread of a tyre, however, as there was no leak, and no loss in pressure, the tpms did not detect it. I saw it whilst doing my weekly pressure tests.
Money and money ?
LOL
 

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Tire was leaking air slowly and had been repaired twice before they told me.

so I should also replace the other rear driver side tire?

wont the sensor still go off? Seems so stupid to me, I’m just supposed to drive it with this light going off from now on?

Read my previous post again!

Is the ABS light on?
Is the CEL light on?

If yes, you may have an ABS issue going on that has nothing to do with the new tire.


Is the dealer still going to warranty the original failed tire?
If yes, when that one comes in replace the other rear tire.

Several folks have replaced tires in pairs on their HRV with no TPMS issues.
 

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As noted above this car does not have sensors in the wheel. It senses off it the abs system. So low air in a tire changes the speed of rotation and is picked up by abs system. I would think a new tire will be slightly taller and will cause the same issue as low air as it’s rotation is slightly different from the other wheel. I personally like this system best as the other makes tire amounting more costly and replacement of sensors is expensive.
ypu can try lowering the air pressure by a few pound or so in increments to see
If you can do it that way. Or maybe another new tire on the same axle should work. I know that adds cost
I also agree with as noted above this tire sensor crap is government garbage forced on us. I know how to use a tire gauge
 

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I also agree with as noted above this tire sensor crap is government garbage forced on us. I know how to use a tire gauge
I have yet to read of an occasion where a tyre gauge detected a puncture or pressure loss whilst the vehicle was being driven. The TPMS on my previous vehicle detected both a puncture and an occasion where some kids thought it funny to tamper with a tyre valve just as I was about to start a 300+ mile motorway journey. Fortunately, I was able to get both tyres repaired for free and was soon on my way.
 

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While there can be situations or arguments for for the benefits of technology, in this case TPMS sensors
My point regarding “ I know how to use a tire gauge” is that the issues they cause ( The original post ) and increased costs to the consumer due to such issues could be eliminated with regular use of a tire gauge and visual inspection. Some issues Weather it be in tire mounting, balancing, replacement of sensors when they fail or if wanting a winter set of tires / need more sensors and calibration. Such as in the original post just needing to replace one tire and now there are issues with warning lights. Theses issues are probably far more common then the example you sited in support of the sensors.
in most all situations visual inspection of tires and use of a tire gauge periodically would be adequate.
catastrophic tire failure thankfully is rare and in that situation a TPMS sensor will not help. However a car owner taking an active roll in maintenance just may be more beneficial then a bunch of warning lights from sensors.
 
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