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John Davis of MotorWeek has always offered the best reviews. Puts the personal opinions aside and tells it like it is. Tune in this weekend to catch his review of the HRV:
I'm sorry but I can't let a statement like that stand without a challenge. MotorWeek is FAR from the best reviews you can find. I don't think I've ever seen a review of theirs that isn't overwhelmingly positive for any car they drive despite how bad it is. Part of the problem is that the format only allows for a 5 minute review of the car so they can't go into detail, but even so they could provide negatives about the cars they review and they just don't. In my mind, MotorWeek is just the automotive industry's lap dog.

Real reviews look at both the positives and negatives of every car. Better yet, they buy the cars from the dealerships and aren't handed them for reviews. Any reviewer who is "given" the car to review is inherently biased to not upset the company who is providing the car. Real reviews where there's no conflict of interest also take an in-depth look at all parts of the car and it's performance and they don't just gloss over negatives and put the positive spin on everything.

As you can imagine, I'll put very little stock into what MotorWeek has to say. If I want to hear the auto makers propaganda, I can read it on their websites, I don't need to hear it regurgitated by MotorWeek.

Now, if "in your opinion" they're the best reviews, of course you're entitled to your opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry to hear that...I like them cause they are realistic...they are not going to make a big deal of performance on a vehicle like this unless it really bad because most people that buy this kind of vehicle aren't expecting performance numbers. To me, MotorWeek is realistic and practical. YMMV ;)

I'm sorry but I can't let a statement like that stand without a challenge. MotorWeek is FAR from the best reviews you can find. I don't think I've ever seen a review of theirs that isn't overwhelmingly positive for any car they drive despite how bad it is. Part of the problem is that the format only allows for a 5 minute review of the car so they can't go into detail, but even so they could provide negatives about the cars they review and they just don't. In my mind, MotorWeek is just the automotive industry's lap dog.

Real reviews look at both the positives and negatives of every car. Better yet, they buy the cars from the dealerships and aren't handed them for reviews. Any reviewer who is "given" the car to review is inherently biased to not upset the company who is providing the car. Real reviews where there's no conflict of interest also take an in-depth look at all parts of the car and it's performance and they don't just gloss over negatives and put the positive spin on everything.

As you can imagine, I'll put very little stock into what MotorWeek has to say. If I want to hear the auto makers propaganda, I can read it on their websites, I don't need to hear it regurgitated by MotorWeek.

Now, if "in your opinion" they're the best reviews, of course you're entitled to your opinion.
 

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I'd have to agree that they're about the last place I'd look for anything other than an unending stream of adoring platitudes. I don't think they've ever met a car that wasn't wonderful. Maybe they can hire an anger translator who can stand next to commentator and say what they're really thinking.
 

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I watched it, nothing we haven't heard before. He, in a sideways sort of way, insinuated that seat comfort might not be great for long trips and that the engine was at the bottom of the category for HP and Torque. You can watch full episodes on their website, but the HR-V episode isn't up just yet.
 

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Here's the transcript from the episode....

2016 Honda HR-V


Episode 3435


The overwhelming onslaught of small SUVs reminds us of the tech and housing booms. And we keep waiting for this bubble to burst as well. When is there enough?! Well, Honda thinks there’s room for one more. And if the new HR-V is anything like the CR-V, we’ll have to agree.
It’s also highly likely that lots of buyers will agree there’s plenty of room in the marketplace for the 2016 Honda HR-V. Now, if fuel prices were at the levels of a year ago it would be a slam dunk.
Still, the ace in this fun-size ute’s hole may be its kinship to the Fit, which the HR-V has a lot more in common with than the larger CR-V. And that means there’s a very solid chassis for driving enjoyment, and Magic Seats inside for unrivaled versatility.
There’s 24.3 cubic feet of cargo space behind the back seat, and a maximum of 58.8 with the seats folded flat. Both numbers larger than Fit and well above direct crossover rivals.
In addition, you can fully recline the front passenger seat for extra-long items. And of course, with the 2nd row Magic Seat folded up, there’s room for items that are taller than many mid-size crossovers can handle.
There’s a familiarity to much of the 5-passenger HR-V’s switchgear and displays, yet the layout appears truly unique to the Honda lineup, as are the touch-based automatic climate controls in EX and EX-L trim. There is good use of soft touch materials, and an available 7-inch touchscreen for infotainment.
The expected youthful flair is present; with a plethora of caffeine and juice box holders, along with a two level center console, with lots of storage space below. It also has Honda’s first electric parking brake.
Front seats could use a little more bolstering and long distance comfort, but they are perfectly fine for commuting duty. The rear seats also offer adequate comfort, and there’s more leg room back here than expected.
A multi-angle rearview camera is standard, and navigation is optional. A large, central, analog speedometer highlights the gauge panel, with tachometer to the left, and info display to the right.
Finding our way to the engine bay, we discover a normally aspirated, single-cam, 1.8-liter I4. Lifted not from the Fit, but from the compact Civic, with a class competent 141 horsepower and 127 lb-ft of torque.
Having that power pass through a thrill-sucking CVT may not sound promising, but the HR-V feels quite peppy and Honda’s CVT is better than most. A 6-speed manual is available as well, but only with front-wheel-drive.
All-wheel-drive models add the CR-V’s automatic Real Time system with Intelligent Control, which just means there’s nothing to turn on, as it sends power rearward whenever the front wheels start slipping. It’s primarily for all-weather duties; though it certainly performs just fine in dirt or gravel road situations as well.
Coupe-like styling is present, which is industry speak for hidden rear door handles and chunky C-pillars. That helps to give it more a “higher ground clearance Civic hatchback appearance” rather than just a Fit on steroids. Wheelbase is 3.2-inches longer than the Fit, at 102.8; with overall length at 169.1-inches. 17-inch alloy wheels are standard.
The hunkered down look also favors the short-lived Accord Crosstour, yet it’s far more attractive, and with its stylish front end, it will be one of the most agreeable offerings in a segment that includes the antagonistic Nissan Juke and cartoonish Jeep Renegade.
Suspension duties are handled by MacPherson struts up front, with a torsion beam in the rear. They deliver a very good ride quality for such a short wheelbase vehicle, with tuning that makes the HR-V feel “beefed-up” compared to the Fit. Cabin noise is also more subdued.
Expect safety to be first rate, with a full suite of airbags and features like Honda LaneWatch available.
Most small vehicles are bought with fuel economy as a priority. And here Government Ratings come in at 28-City, 35-Highway, and 31-Combined for 2-wheel-drive; and 27-City, 32-Highway, and 29-Combined for all-wheel-drive.
At $19,995, a front drive manual HR-V neatly slots between the Fit and CR-V. A CVT adds $800. All-wheel drive start at $22,045.
Well it looks like there is indeed room for one-more small crossover. So Honda dealers, prepare to clear some space. Though not too much, as while the all-new 2016 Honda HR-V offers plenty of it inside, it doesn’t take up a whole lot of it outside. And, we don’t think they’ll stick around your lot very long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for posting. Sounds great!


Here's the transcript from the episode....

2016 Honda HR-V


Episode 3435


The overwhelming onslaught of small SUVs reminds us of the tech and housing booms. And we keep waiting for this bubble to burst as well. When is there enough?! Well, Honda thinks there’s room for one more. And if the new HR-V is anything like the CR-V, we’ll have to agree.
It’s also highly likely that lots of buyers will agree there’s plenty of room in the marketplace for the 2016 Honda HR-V. Now, if fuel prices were at the levels of a year ago it would be a slam dunk.
Still, the ace in this fun-size ute’s hole may be its kinship to the Fit, which the HR-V has a lot more in common with than the larger CR-V. And that means there’s a very solid chassis for driving enjoyment, and Magic Seats inside for unrivaled versatility.
There’s 24.3 cubic feet of cargo space behind the back seat, and a maximum of 58.8 with the seats folded flat. Both numbers larger than Fit and well above direct crossover rivals.
In addition, you can fully recline the front passenger seat for extra-long items. And of course, with the 2nd row Magic Seat folded up, there’s room for items that are taller than many mid-size crossovers can handle.
There’s a familiarity to much of the 5-passenger HR-V’s switchgear and displays, yet the layout appears truly unique to the Honda lineup, as are the touch-based automatic climate controls in EX and EX-L trim. There is good use of soft touch materials, and an available 7-inch touchscreen for infotainment.
The expected youthful flair is present; with a plethora of caffeine and juice box holders, along with a two level center console, with lots of storage space below. It also has Honda’s first electric parking brake.
Front seats could use a little more bolstering and long distance comfort, but they are perfectly fine for commuting duty. The rear seats also offer adequate comfort, and there’s more leg room back here than expected.
A multi-angle rearview camera is standard, and navigation is optional. A large, central, analog speedometer highlights the gauge panel, with tachometer to the left, and info display to the right.
Finding our way to the engine bay, we discover a normally aspirated, single-cam, 1.8-liter I4. Lifted not from the Fit, but from the compact Civic, with a class competent 141 horsepower and 127 lb-ft of torque.
Having that power pass through a thrill-sucking CVT may not sound promising, but the HR-V feels quite peppy and Honda’s CVT is better than most. A 6-speed manual is available as well, but only with front-wheel-drive.
All-wheel-drive models add the CR-V’s automatic Real Time system with Intelligent Control, which just means there’s nothing to turn on, as it sends power rearward whenever the front wheels start slipping. It’s primarily for all-weather duties; though it certainly performs just fine in dirt or gravel road situations as well.
Coupe-like styling is present, which is industry speak for hidden rear door handles and chunky C-pillars. That helps to give it more a “higher ground clearance Civic hatchback appearance” rather than just a Fit on steroids. Wheelbase is 3.2-inches longer than the Fit, at 102.8; with overall length at 169.1-inches. 17-inch alloy wheels are standard.
The hunkered down look also favors the short-lived Accord Crosstour, yet it’s far more attractive, and with its stylish front end, it will be one of the most agreeable offerings in a segment that includes the antagonistic Nissan Juke and cartoonish Jeep Renegade.
Suspension duties are handled by MacPherson struts up front, with a torsion beam in the rear. They deliver a very good ride quality for such a short wheelbase vehicle, with tuning that makes the HR-V feel “beefed-up” compared to the Fit. Cabin noise is also more subdued.
Expect safety to be first rate, with a full suite of airbags and features like Honda LaneWatch available.
Most small vehicles are bought with fuel economy as a priority. And here Government Ratings come in at 28-City, 35-Highway, and 31-Combined for 2-wheel-drive; and 27-City, 32-Highway, and 29-Combined for all-wheel-drive.
At $19,995, a front drive manual HR-V neatly slots between the Fit and CR-V. A CVT adds $800. All-wheel drive start at $22,045.
Well it looks like there is indeed room for one-more small crossover. So Honda dealers, prepare to clear some space. Though not too much, as while the all-new 2016 Honda HR-V offers plenty of it inside, it doesn’t take up a whole lot of it outside. And, we don’t think they’ll stick around your lot very long.
 
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